Wednesday, May 20, 2020

Gold Winner Book Award! - Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride!

Announced nationally on May 18, 2020

Click Here to go to The Eric Hoffer Book Award site

Gold Book Award Winner in the
Middle Reader category for The
Eric Hoffer Book Award:
Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride

An honor to receive The Eric Hoffer Gold Winner Book Award in the Middle Reader category

Announced nationally on May 8, 2020


Silver Award Winner in the
Transportation category for the
eLit Book Awards:
Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride

The first book award for Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride to be announced nationally!
Truly an exciting experience when we first learned. 

Blueink Reviews only assigns the prestigious "Starred" Review to about 5% of the books reviewed each year.  That Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride, received the starred review and recognized as a Blueink Review Notable Book is an honor.


I’m pleased to be attaching a pdf of the May spread in Booklist Magazine which includes your BlueInk review.  Booklist Magazine is the premier review source used by librarians to purchase titles for their collections.  The magazine is used by tens of thousands of librarians across the country.

 

In an effort to help librarians purchase independently published titles for their collections, Booklist Magazine has partnered with BlueInk Review to offer a monthly list of notable independent books.  We were pleased to include your book review in our monthly list.



Yours sincerely,

Patricia Moosbrugger

Managing Partner

BlueInk Review

Released nationally on May 15, 2020

Congratulations! You have received a coveted Starred Review
from Blueink Review.

Click Here to go to the Starred Blueink Review online

Blueink Starred Review
Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride
Jean M. Flahive
(Reviewed January 20. 2020)

In Jean Flahive's delightful historical fiction work for young readers, a girl growing up in rural Maine witnesses monumental events of the early 20th century.

The book begins as 96-year-old Millie visits Maine's Seashore Trolley Museum to witness the restoration of the renowned "Narcissus," an electric trolley car that was part of the transport system popularized during the early 20th century. During her visit, memories take her back to a childhood in rural Maine.

The year is 1911. Ever the dreamer, seven-year-old Millie Thayer imagines a life beyond her family farm. Such thoughts are enhanced by a fortune teller's prediction that Millie will someday meet a "notable" individual.

Three years later, when a new trolley line is up and running in her hometown, Millie meets the former President Teddy Roosevelt as he travels aboard the Narcissus. Over the next decade, she learns about Roosevelt through a budding friendship she develops with a wilderness guide who is closely acquainted with Teddy. Her worldly curiosity is also peaked via informative conversations she has with a leading suffragette traveling the trolley system.

Rich in local and world history, the colorful story weaves historical content throughout about WWl, a deadly pandemic and other important events of the time. Ultimately, Millie and her family must face the worries and grief of the era, and hope for a triumphant future.

Final words from both the author and real-life restoration project manager, Phil Morse, lend insight into the historic transport system.

In this engaging narrative, Flahive weaves a charming, uplifting story by employing palpable writing that allows readers to experience the triumphs and tragedies of the days past. Its solid and engaging storytelling style, buoyed by likeable characters, will appeal to a young audience, as well as train enthusiasts, Teddy Roosevelt fans, and lovers of history.

Also available as an ebook.

Award-winning Maine author, Jean Flahive

The audiobook master files were uploaded to Audible on April 26, 2020. It generally takes 30 business days for the audiobook to be processed and made available to purchase through Audible, iTunes, etc...so, the audiobook may be available early in June 2020.

2-minute, 30-second, Retail Audio Sample of the Audiobook 


The paperback edition of Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride can be purchased online through the Seashore Trolley Museum's store website. Books purchased through the Museum's website directly benefit the Museum and the Narcissus project. Amazon book purchases also benefit the Museum and the Narcissus.

Click Here to go to the Museum Store webpage to order online

Click Here to go to the Amazon page to order the book online

Click Here to go to the ebook page

Books are available at these local bookstores in Maine:
The Book Review, Falmouth
The Bookworm, Gorham
Letterpress Books, Portland
Nonesuch Books and More, South Portland
Nubble Books, Biddeford
Sherman's Maine Coast Book Shops - All locations

     Millie Thayer is a headstrong farmer's daughter who chases her dreams in a way you would expect a little girl nicknamed "Spitfire" would-running full tilt and with her eyes on the stars. Dreaming of leaving the farm life, working in the city, and fighting for women's right to vote, Millie imagines flying away on a magic carpet. One day, that flying carpet shows up in the form of an electric trolley that cuts across her farm. A fortune-teller predicts that Millie's path will cross that of someone famous. Suddenly, she finds herself caught up in events that shake the nation, Maine, and her family. Despairing that her dreams may be shattered, Millie learns, in an unexpected way, that dreams can be shared.

Click Here to read the post - Three 5-Star Reviews from Readers' Favorite posted on January 6, 2020

Click Here to read January 24, 2020 - Four-Star Clarion Review

Click Here to read January 19, 2020 - Theodore Roosevelt Center Blog Post Review

Click Here to read the December 25, 2019 4-Stars out of 4-Stars Review through OnlineBookClub

The "Elegant Ride" in Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride is the 1912 Portland-Lewiston Interurban, No. 14, Narcissus. Seashore Trolley Museum is currently restoring the majestic, high-speed, luxury electric interurban to operating condition in Kennebunkport, Maine. 

Here is an example of how donations to the Narcissus Project now will help with the interpretation portion of the project. The interpretation programming will include exhibits, displays, education programming. During 2019, through generous donations to the Narcissus Project, we were able to conserve, replicate, and have high resolutions digital image files made of the original, 1910, 25.5-foot long, surveyor map of the elevation and grade of the 30-mile private right-of-way of the Portland, Gray, and Lewiston Railroad (Portland-Lewiston Interurban)
MUST-READ! - Click Here 

Please Consider a Donation to the Narcissus Project
to help us tell the incredible story of the Narcissus through the interpretation portion of the Narcissus Project.
Thank You

   Inside the Donald G. Curry Town House Restoration Shop, the Narcissus is in the midst of major work as we strive to complete its restoration. With our estimate to have the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Narcissus in the fall of 2021, we are now planning the interpretation portion of the Narcissus Project. Donations to the Narcissus Project may be used in the future to help tell the incredible 100-plus-year-old story of the Narcissus. Your donation to the Narcissus is helping to make the dream of the project's success, a reality.

See below for Donation options -
It starts with YOU
Your Donation Matters
Make a Donation TODAY

Please Help the Narcissus. 
Donation Options to Help the Narcissus Project:

The New England Electric Railway Historical Society (NEERHS)
is the 501c3 organization that owns and operates the Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, ME and the National Streetcar
The NEERHS is registered with the IRS (EIN# 01-0244457) and was incorporated in Maine in 1941.

Check or Money Order ***** should be made payable to:
New England Electric Railway Historical Society (NEERHS)
In the memo please write: Narcissus Fund 816-A
Mail to: Seashore Trolley Museum
              P. O. Box A
              Kennebunkport, ME 04046

Credit Card ***** donations can be a one-time donation or you
may choose to have a specific amount charged to your card
automatically on a monthly basis. Please contact the Museum bookkeeper, Connie, via email at finance@NEERHS.org or by phone, 207-967-2712 ext. 5.

Online Donations - may be made by using a Credit Card: 
Click Here to make an online donation through the Museum's website - When at the Donation page: Fill in donor info, etc., when at "To which fund are you donating? Scroll down to "Other" and type in: 816-A Narcissus, then continue on filling in the required information.

Click Here for PayPal - to make an online donation: you can use email: finance@NEERHS.org and in the message box write:
For Narcissus fund 816-A

Donation of Securities ***** We also accept donations of
securities. You can contact the Museum bookkeeper, Connie, via email at finance@NEERHS.org or by phone, 207-967-2712 ext. 5,
for brokerage account information for accepting donated securities.

BONUS ***** If you work for a company/corporation that will
"match" an employee's donation to an approved 501c3 non-profit
educational organization, please be sure to complete the necessary paperwork with your employer so that your donation is matched :)

Questions? ***** Please contact Narcissus project manager:
Phil Morse, pmorse31@gmail.com or call 207-985-9723 - cell.

Thank You :)

Thank You for our Current Funding Partners
20th Century Electric Railway Foundation - 2018 - Major Gift, 2017/2014 Matching Grants
Renaissance Charitable Foundation (LPCT) by Fiduciary Trust Charitable Giving Fund
Mass Bay RRE - 2018 Railroad Preservation Grant 
Thornton Academy (Saco, ME) - Staff & Alumni - Matching Grant Challenge 2014
New England Electric Railway Historical Society (Kennebunkport, ME) - Member Donations
Amherst Railway Society - 2015 Heritage Grant
National Railway Historical Society - 2016 & 2015 Heritage Preservation Grants
Enterprise Holding Foundation - 2015 Community Grant
Theodore Roosevelt Association - Member Donations
John Libby Family Association and Member Donations
* The Conley Family - In Memory of Scott Libbey 2018/2017/2016/2015
* The W. S. Libbey Family - Awalt, Conley, Graf, Holman, Libbey, McAvoy, McLaughlin, Meldrum, O'Halloran, Salto, - 2018/2017
* The Hughes Family 2017/2016/2010
New Gloucester Historical Society and Member Donations
Gray Historical Society and Member Donations
Gray Public Library Association - Pat Barter Speaker Series
* LogMein - Matching Employee Donation
* IBM - Matching Employee/Retiree Donations
* Fidelity Charitable Grant - Matching Employee Donations
* Richard E. Erwin Grant - 2017/2016

The Narcissus, with interior back-lit, stained glass windows are majestic.
Make a donation today to help restore the interior of this Maine gem.
Help Theodore Roosevelt's Maine Ride get back on track! Once restored,
you will be able to ride in luxury on this National Register Treasure at
Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, Maine.
PWM photo

Please Consider Making a Donation to the project of the National Register of Historic Places member, Narcissus. We are currently raising funds to tell the incredible story of this Maine gem.

Various News stories during the summer of 2015 about the
Narcissus and its connection to Theodore Roosevelt. TR
was a passenger on the Narcissus on August 18, 1914.

Click Here to See the list of All Previous Blog Posts - Index

The Narcissus - July 31, 2015. Make a donation today.
Help Theodore Roosevelt's Maine Ride get back on track!
Once restored, you will be able to ride in luxury on this
Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, Maine.

Wednesday, April 8, 2020

Field Guide to Maine Trolley Car Types 1870s-1930s

No. 12 Bangor Street Railway with its original type trolley
pole. This car was the first electric trolley in Maine. Crew
members are O'Brien and Coombs. The motorman would
operate the car from the platform with no protection
from the elements. It would be 1906 before Maine
laws were enacted to enclose the platforms.
 Image from C. D. Heseltine Coll.

4-8-2020 -Maine Historical Society has created companion classroom lesson plans inspired by Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride - These State-standard-based lesson plans for classroom use in grades 6, 7, and 8 are now complete. They will be uploaded in the next week or so to the Maine Memory Network and will be included with the other statewide lesson plans K-12. Once a link is available, it will be posted on Maine Memory Network and also on the Seashore Trolley Museum's website.

This blog post was created specifically to support the new lesson plan titled:

* "Clang, Clang, Clang, Went the Trolley..."

Objective: Students will be able to identify different types of trolley cars and how they were used historically in Maine.

This post is to provide supplemental information, variations, images and descriptions that expand on those three main types and the 20 subsets presented in Procedure #7 Field Guide to Trolley Cars by Amber Tatnall, Seashore Trolley Museum Library and posted in Maine Memory Network

Procedure #6: There are three main types of trolley car - passenger, freight, utility
Procedure #7: This assignment includes researching these various types. 
This blog post delves into the subsets within the three main types of trolley cars expanding descriptions and examples.
Procedure #8: This post will be useful for filling out the "Trolley Car Note Catcher" using other historical records that provide useful information on types of cars.

Here we go...
The Portland Railroad Company was initially a horsecar railroad starting 1863. The system started to electrify in 1892 and discontinued its electric trolley service in 1941. Over its many years of operation, the company owned and operated nearly 400 vehicles. There are many images of the many different electric railway vehicles in the system. Images below are from several Maine railway systems, but many are from the Portland system. 

Passenger Cars (Main Type #1)

Horse car (Subset #1) Subsets will all begin with text as described in Field Guide to Trolley Cars by Amber Tatnall
An early mode of public transportation was the horse car. Horse cars were often open cars, drawn by horses or mules. It is interesting to note that cars rode on tracks.
With the advent of electricity, horse cars were replaced by trolley cars with electric motors.

In the image below, Portland Railroad horsecar - the body of this horsecar is described as an open bench horsecar with a turtleback roof, or a rounded roof. The area that the driver is standing in is called the front platform. The roof above the driver is called the platform roof, or a platform hood, or canopy. The short metal wall or petition in front of the driver is called a dasher. Open cars were used during months that the weather was warmer. The image is circa 1887. During 1890, the Portland Railroad Company operated a total of 11 miles of horsecar tracks for passenger operations. The company had 50 horsecars, both open bench cars, and closed cars, and owned 225 horses.


Horsecar at Union Station while it was still being built-1887
There was a crew of two working on the car. The driver drove
the team of horses and the conductor, working from the
rear platform, would collect the fare from passengers. 
Five-cents was the fare to ride between scheduled stops. 
This car will go from St. John Street at Union Station Square 
along Congress Street to Monument Square.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
 O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_32_004

Below is a closed horsecar. It has a deck roof, also known as a monitor roof The deck roof space with rectangular glass windows is called the clerestoryClosed cars were used year-round, though less frequently during the summer months. During the winter months, a closed car may have an operating wood or coal stove in the passenger compartment. With the open platform, the operator would be exposed to the elements. Winter months, no protection from extreme cold, snow, freezing rain, etc. The partition with a doorway that separates the driver from the passengers in the car body is called the bulkhead. During winters that received lots of snow, the wheels and axles of the cars were replaced with runners and operated as sleighs. You may recognize the train shed canopy in the background? Have you attended a concert or been ice skating at Thompson's Point in Portland? One section of the canopy in this image is the canopy used for the ice skating rink at Thompson's Point.

Portland Railroad Horsecar No. 54 at the train shed of
Union Station. Image is circa 1888 
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
 O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_32_038

The closed horsecar below originally was bought for use by the Ocean Street Railroad in Portland.
Ocean Street horsecars operated only along Ocean Street, which is now Ocean Avenue in Portland. The Portland Railroad bought this company in 1895. Notice the style of the closed car and its roof is very different compared to the previous two images of horsecars. Like differences in automobiles depending on the manufacturer, trolley cars may have some variations depending on the manufacturer. This car has a turtleback or rounded roof style.

Horsecar No. 13 on the Ocean Street line circa 1882
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
 O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_31_035
Closed car (Subset #2)
Closed cars had a roof, floor, end bulkheads, and sides with windows that could not be removed, although they could be opened.
Closed cars were generally in use during the cooler months of the year. Some closed cars had coal-burning water heaters that heated the cars.

To help narrow the field of closed cars in this subset, the term standard will be used as an additional qualifier for cars pictured is this series.

There are many, many different subset types of closed electric trolley cars. Once horsecars were electrified, manufacturers adapted to the growing needs of electric railway companies serving their communities and the designs, capacity to carry passengers, the speed they could travel, and the materials used to construct the cars continued to evolve. Below will be just a few of the variations.

The image below shows one of the very early electric closed cars in Portland that operated in Westbrook. It was common for many of the horsecar railroads to simply add electric motors to some of their horsecars. The design of the car below is still similar to a horsecar with both ends being open platforms, but the body is larger than most closed horsecars. This larger car is a double-truck car. truck is the set of wheels, electric motor(s), and axle(s) that the body of the trolley car rests on. This car rests on two separate sets of trucks, so the common term used is double-truckThese wheels are typical for horsecars. Over time, the weight of the motors and an increase in the number from one to two motors that each truck would hold dictated that the truck frame, wheels, and axles sets would need to be structurally enhanced. 

For three years, prior to electrification of the Munjoy Hill
area, horses were used to tow electric trolley cars each day
for use on the Westbrook line from the Bennett
Street carhouse to Monument Square. Image circa 1893.
O. R. Cummings book,
"Portland Railroad" Part 1, 1957.

In the image above, a single trolley pole was added to the middle of the deck roof. The trolley poles of the early electric cars had a large brass trolley wheel attached to the end of the pole that was designed to connect with the energized overhead wire and conduct the electricity from the wire, through the pole, to the controls and motors in the car. The trolley wheel is meant to "troll" behind the trolley car as the car moves forward. If the car has a stop and needs to reverse its direction, the pole would need to be redirected first. While stopped, the conductor, using the rope attached to the end of the pole, would first pull the pole down, disconnecting the pole from the overhead wire. Then the conductor, while holding the rope to the pole and keeping the pole in a lowered position, would walk around the car until the pole is at the opposite end of the car and then carefully relax the tension on the pole, allowing it to rise up towards the overhead wire while directing the wheel on the end of the pole to properly connect to the wire overhead. There were 600-volts of direct current (DC) flowing through the overhead wire. Handling the trolley pole improperly while it is connected to the overhead wire was dangerous.

The image below has two trolley cars at Seashore Trolley Museum. One car has its trolley pole raised and connected to the overhead wire. The other trolley pole is lowered, but clearly, you can see the trolley wheel at the end of the trolley pole. The trolley pole that is raised is making the connection to the wire with a more modern device than the trolley wheel. In the later "teens" of the 20th century, the new trolley shoe was released. A smaller device than the wheel, it uses a carbon insert to conduct the electricity. This insert is inexpensive and easily replaced.

A nice shot of the overhead wires and rooftops of two
cars at Seashore Trolley Museum at the end of an ice cream
trolley event. PWM image

The platforms of horsecars became known as the vestibules when the platform area became enclosed. And the drivers of the cars became known as "motormen" when operating the motorized electric cars. The motorman continued to be exposed to the various weather conditions when operating the cars with only the canopy overhead and the short bulkhead in front.

PRR No. 103 (sister car to No. 105 & 108) was built in 1895
by J. G. Brill Company, Philadelphia, PA. Motormen would
operate in platforms/vestibules open to all elements and
temperatures for another ten years.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_35_019

Biddeford & Saco Railroad motorman,
Pat Kearney, at the end of the line in
Old Orchard Beach on a cold winter
day in 1914. Dressed to try and keep
warm while operating the trolley.
image PWM

When a law was passed that all closed cars must have enclosed vestibules, existing cars with open vestibules like No. 104 below, had their vestibules rebuilt. All new closed trolleys ordered were constructed with enclosed vestibules.

PRR No. 104 (sister car to No. 105 & 108) was built in 1895
by J. G. Brill Company, Philadelphia, PA. Vestibules were not
enclosed until 1905. Here at Fort Allen Park. This is a smaller
single-truck closed car.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_38_024

Wages  - 1900
Electric Railways in Maine employed 941 (an increase from 1899) with a total payroll of $423,500.

Portland Railroad  - Daily Wage - Motorman $1.60, Machinist $1.82, Other Shop $2.25, Other Employee $1.50 (1900 $1 = $30.79 2020)

Closed trolley cars for Portland started getting larger and were operating on many streets. Electric trolley cars that provided city passenger service were commonly called streetcars. Below, you see that this larger closed car is very different from the earlier closed cars. Much larger, double-truck car with a different roof style. The roof is called a railroad roof. This roof style was very common on large steam railroad passenger coaches. The car below also has two separate trolleys poles. The pole above the conductor that is standing on the fender (commonly called a cow or people catcher), is secured in the lowered position. That means that the car will be traveling forward from this end of the car. The pole on the opposite end of the car will be in the extended or raised position. 


No. 158 in the snow with destination sign; South Windham
via Brighton Avenue. 158 was built in 1901 by the
J. G. Brill Co., for operation on the Westbrook line of PRR.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_36_062

During World War l, the closed cars serving Pond Cove (Cape Elizabeth), were converted to "one-man" cars. And following World War l, the other closed cars, over time, were converted to having an operating crew of one. The economic times following World War l would also lead to the gradual, but steady removal of open cars in the operating fleet.

No. 249 built in 1911 with destination Pond Cove was
converted to "one-man" crew operations during WWl. That
meant the motorman had to change the poles when stopped
at the end of the line. I think this image captures the change
taking place. Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library;
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_34_090

This closed car shown below was one of the more modern electric trolleys to operate in Maine. Manufactured in 1926 and described as a double-truck, steel lightweight, double-ended closed car, with an arch roof. The body of this car was constructed using a lot of lightweight steel.  Double-ended means that the trolley car has controls to operate the car on both ends of the car. There are also two trolley poles on the arch roof. The trolley pole on the right end of the car has been lowered and is secured to the roof. This means that the car will move forward using the controls at this end of the car. 

This trolley operated in Sanford & Springvale, Maine. The 
York Utilities Company operated the passenger service between 
Sanford & Springvale until service ended on April 1, 1947. 
Here is No. 88 (or 90?) in Springvale. No. 88
was the last trolley car in Maine to carry passengers during
a public operation. No. 88 was acquired by Seashore Trolley
Museum for historic preservation and is listed in the 
funding needed to have its turn being restored.
 O. R. Cummings' Collection

Open car (Subset #3)
Open cars were generally in use during the summer months for city and suburban service. Open cars had a roof, floor, and end bulkhead, but no sides.
The seats typically extended across the car. Canvas curtails amounted between the side posts could be pulled down to the floor during summer squalls to protect passengers from wind and rain.
Open cars are often referred to by the number of seats or benches provided: a 14-bench car, for example.

Like the closed cars, electric motorized open cars, affectionately called "breezers" became larger. Many double-truck open cars operated over many years on the Portland Railroad lines and divisions.

In preparation for the Westbrook electrification, four
double-truck open trolley cars were
built during 1892 in PRR's own Bennett Street carhouse
shop on Munjoy Hill for use specifically in Westbrook.
Seen here is No. 77, one of the four open cars built in 1892.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
 O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_36_040

No. 70 was one of the two original open cars for the  Deering
line. The single-truck car built 1891 by the Portland Railroad
in their shop. Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_31_041

The larger open cars could carry 75 passengers. During summer days, thousands of passengers a day would be transported to various recreation-related venues; including a number of trolley parks like Riverton Park, beaches, theaters, lakes, etc. 

Another busy day at Riverton Park. Open trolley cars like
the ones in this image could each carry 75 passengers.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_31_103

Cape Cottage theater Postcard of PWM

1903 - The Portland Railroad System
     Following the opening of the extension to Saco-Old Orchard Beach, the PRR operated 77.82 miles of route and 93.75 track miles, employed more than 500 persons; including 133 motormen and 133 conductors, and owned a total of 217 passenger trolley cars, while serving the communities of:
     * Portland
     * South Portland
     * Cape Elizabeth
     * Scarborough
     * Saco
     * Old Orchard Beach
     * Westbrook
     * Gorham
      * South Windham
      * Falmouth
      * Cumberland
      * Yarmouth

More than 13 million passengers were carried on the Portland Railroad system during the year ending June 30, 1904, with revenues of $686,000. Net profit of $86,000. Stockholders of Portland Railroad Company shared dividends of nearly $60,000.
(What do these numbers equate to in "2020" dollars?)

During the summer months, through service to OOB was provided by passengers changing cars at Dunstan Corner in Scarborough. 30-minute headway, although on Sundays and Holidays, 15-minute was common and trips often ran in sections of two or three cars to handle heavy ridership. Winter service did 60-mins to OOB and 30-mins to Saco.

Three 14-bench open cars approach Monument Square
from Saco/Old Orchard Beach. These three open trolleys
were built in 1902 to be used for the Saco Division. Image
circa 1905 Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library;
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_35_066

In 1910, only about 10% of the population in Maine had electricity in their homes - Early Electric Power companies’ major revenue was from lighting Main Streets, larger mills/manufacturing, & Electric Railways.

Trolley tracks in Middle Street, Portland, Maine.
Postcard postmarked November 5, 1909, from PWM

Starting in 1863, Monument Square was the hub for the
Portland Railroad Company's far-reaching public
transportation system.  Image circa 1910 Print courtesy-PWM

Notice that many of the trolley cars in the above photo are different colors. For many years the trolley cars were painted different colors according to the line (or later the division) on which they were operated. The company name was on the lower side panel (on closed cars) & sill (on open cars).

*  Light green - Union Station-Munjoy Hill
*  Blue with gold striping - Spring Street-Grand Trunk Station
*  Red - Union Station - Grand Truck Station
*  Red (different shade) - Stroudwater (and later South Portland)
*  Yellow - Deering (later Yarmouth were also yellow and then changed to green)
*  Brown (later dark green) - Westbrook (same as Saco Div. later)

About 1920, the company settled on one paint scheme for all divisions. Red body with white and blue trimming and gold leaf numerals. Roofs gray. The company name was omitted when standard colors applied.

Semi-convertible cars (Subset #4)
Semi-convertible cars were closed cars with cross-seats, and with entrance and exit platforms at the ends.
The windows were constructed so that both the upper and lowers sashes of the side windows could be removed or raised in warm weather, making the car sides completely open between the window sills and the side plates.

The image below is an example of cross-seats in a semi-convertible closed car as mentioned in the description above. Notice the construction of the window frames, also called sashes, and the design allowing for opening or removal as mentioned in the description above. Advertising cards are displayed above the windows. Local businesses paid to display their advertisements cards in the cars and was another source of revenue for the trolley company.

Cross seats in the interior of semi-convertible car No. 196
of the Portland Railroad Company. No. 196 was built in 1902.
These particular seats are also reversible. By grasping the
handle on the top corner and moving the seat-back towards
the opposite side of the seat-bottom, the seat direction is
then reversed. Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library;
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_38_079

The image below has an example of longitudinal seating, the more common seating arrangement in horsecars and then closed cars, prior to cross-seating becoming the more popular option for newer cars being manufactured.

The interior of Nos. 194 & 195, standard closed cars built in
1902 for the Portland Railroad.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library;
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_38_074

Common Street, near City Hall, in Waterville. Standing in the 
open platform is Arthur L. Foster of Augusta. Eight of these
single-end, semi-convertible observation cars were purchased
Originally, these cars only had a controller and brake valve
in the enclosed vestibule end. A short time after arriving,
however, a controller and brake valve was installed in the
observation platform end, as seen here in this image.
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_21_175

The image below is of No 173. One of 18 semi-convertible cars purchased in 1902 by the Portland Road. The Portland Railroad cars serving the Saco Division, either traveled from Monument Square Maine Street Saco (15.45 miles one way) or traveled to Old Orchard Beach (14.43 miles one way). The distance, frequency of daily trips, and large numbers of passengers, particularly in the summer months, required heavy, suburban-type semi-convertible cars and the larger open cars. 173 was one of the eight larger, 34-foot, semi-convertibles with railroad roofs, each containing a smoking compartment.

PRR No. 173, waiting on Main Street, Saco, on the
Biddeford & Saco RR trackage circa 1903, was
destroyed by fire at Oak Hill, Scarborough, January
22, 1915. Trucks and electrical equipment salvaged
were installed on bo. 502, which operated until 1941.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library;
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_33_022

No. 760 is one of eight center-entrance trailers used in Portland.
 As a trailer, they had no motors and would be attached to a
motorized car, in this image, the motorized car is 1902, semi-
convertible car No. 191. The trailers were used primarily on the 
Westbrook line. The trolley pole was used to provide current
for the heat and lights in the trailer. The semi-convertibles
were very versatile, dependable, heavy cars with the power 
needed to properly handle hauling the extra weight of pulling
these large trailers.   
O. R. Cummings Collection

No. 502 in front of the Grand Trunk Railroad Depot. No. 502
 was the largest (35-ft.) and fastest car on the Portland system.
A semi-convertible car built in 1915, it was used
occasionally over the Portland-Lewiston Interurban.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library;
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_35_073

Birney Safety Car (Subset #5)
Birney Safety Cars were small, single-truck cars made of lightweight steel.
The word "truck" refers to the set of wheels under the car. Singl-truck cars had one set of four wheels. Double-truck cars had two sets.
The Birney cars were popular with street railways between 1910 and 1930 and were designed to be operated by only one person, saving labor costs during wartime.

Charles O. Birney was an engineer on the staff of a firm named, Stone & Webster in the second decade of the 20th century. He was assigned to design a lightweight, single-truck trolley car. He did and from that design, in 1916, he introduced, what would become his famous "Birney Safety Car."
Tens of thousands of theses single-truck, lightweight cars with an arch roof would be manufactured for electric railway companies. The car would be operated with a single motorman with no need for a conductor. Interiors of the cars were generally fitted with reversible wooden seats that would generally carry no more than 30-32 passengers. 

No. 20 was Bangor's first single-truck, Birney Safety Car,
arriving in the fall of 1918. Here it is on Main Street, opposite
the carbarn in Bangor, in 1935. 
Image from Charles D. Heseltine Collection

Interior of Bangor's Birney Car No 20 - the clean lines and the 
wooden seats were a feature of most of the cars of this type.
Image from Charles D. Heseltine Collection

Such success was had by the single-truck Birney cars, that other trolley car manufacturers went on to make similar lightweight safety cars and expanded the type to provide larger, double-truck versions.

Bangor Railway & Electric Company's No. 14 in Hampden.
One-of-seven, 8-wheel (double-truck), light-weight, safety
cars built in 1921, that arrived in Bangor from the Wason
Company in Springfield, MA, in 1922. Primarily used for the
Hampden and Brewer line. Numbered 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16,
and 18, all were sold in 1942 to the Johnstown (PA)
Traction Company (JTC), where they were renumbered
from 305 through 311. All but No. 311 were scrapped in
1947. No. 311 stayed in service until 1961. No. 311 was
saved and sold to the Rockhill Trolley Museum (PA)
See more about Bangor's only surviving trolley and
its happy home in Rockhill Furnace, PA.
Photo courtesy of Joel Salomon

Wason Car Company's builder's photo from 1921 of the interior
of  Bangor Railway & Electric Company's No. 16, the sister
car to No. 14, now restored as Johnstown Traction Company
Photo courtesy of Pennsylvania Trolley Museum

One surviving Portland Railroad trolley - is a Birney Safety Car - of the hundreds of trolley cars that operated on the Portland Railroad, they are all gone but one...
     No. 615 was built for the PRR in 1920 by the Wason Manufacturing Company, Springfield, MA. In 1936, it was sold to the Biddeford & Saco Railroad and operated in the Biddeford, Saco, and Old Orchard Beach area until 1939. The body of 615 survived being scrapped when the buses
took over by becoming the track department's shanty while overhead wires and other track-related work was being done. A Seashore Trolley Museum member bought 615 when the work was complete. 615 came to the Museum in 1941.

At Thornton Heights (Route One), South Portland,
No. 615 being loaded for delivery to Saco - 1926
615 is awaiting the funding to be restored. It is
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection

Parlor car (Subset #6)
Parlor cars were luxurious interurban cars or special chartered cars for city service. They often were fitted out with individual seats or armchairs, carpeting, draperies, mirrors, stained glass windows, and fine wood paneling.
Observation platforms at the ends of the cars had ornamental wrought iron railings. These cars were hired for special events or excursions and were often employed by the railroad commissioners during rail inspections.
There were only ever two parlor cars in Maine. The Merrymeeting ran for the Lewiston, Brunswick & Bath Street Railway and the Bramhall ran for the Portland Railroad Company.

Parlor Car - Bramhall - arrives 1896
The double-truck parlor car trolley, "Bramhall", was built in 1896 by the J. G. Brill Company, Philadelphia, PA, and is said to have been given free to the Portland Railroad in appreciation for past and anticipated future business. Seen below, it was primarily for use by PRR officials, but it was available for charter by special parties - at an extra rate, of course. It was a handsome one, painted in shiny black with gold leaf trim and lettering, and had ornamental iron grillwork on the ends. Interior was fitted with 20 wicker chairs with plush seats, tasseled curtains at the windows, and two cupboards (for spirits) at each end. In 1916, it was rebuilt as an experimental pre-payment car and became No. 500. It was scrapped in the 1920s.
     
The parlor car, Bramhall, at Fort Allen shortly after arriving
in Portland in 1896.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_38_034

The Portland Railroad parlor car, Bramhall.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_38_033

The interior of the parlor car, Bramhall.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_49_003

The "Merrymeeting" parlor car at Togus station. A double-truck
parlor car built in 1899 for the Lewiston, Brunswick & Bath
Street Railway, at a cost of $7,000. It could be chartered
for $10 a day and traveled all over the LA&W line.
 O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_21_130

The "Merrymeeting" at the Tacoma Inn near Lewiston.
 Photo courtesy of Seashore Trolley Museum's Library. 

Interurban car (Subset #7)
Interurban cars were used in long-distance service, as distinguished from a city or suburban cars. 
Interurban passenger cars were large - up to 65 feet of very sturdy construction - and were capable of traveling at high speeds. They looked very similar to steam railroad coaches.

There were many electric railways in Maine that operated long-distance service. Generally, they used larger semi-convertibles, perhaps larger combination cars, and other large standard double-truck cars to provide the service. In Maine, the only true, Interurban system that used interurban coaches, was the Portland-Lewiston Interurban Railroad Company. 

The seven interurban coaches that operated on the line were 46-foot in length; with four-90hp Westinghouse motors, which would reach speeds in excess of 70 mph. The exteriors painted a shiny dark Pullman green with each of them having their name in gold leaf on the side of the car. Six of these magnificent interurban coaches were named after a flower that is commonly known in Maine. And the seventh, arriving during Maine's Bicentennial year, 1920, was named Maine.
Arbutus, Gladiolus, Narcissus, Clematis, Azaela, Magnolia, and Maine.

Featuring forty, ornate, leaded stained glass windows; after passing through the smoking compartment with two, six-foot-long, leather-covered bench seats, you enter the passenger compartment, containing reversible seats upholstered in green mohair plush; encircled with walls and trim boards of Santo Domingo mahogany panels each with decorative bands of holly and ebony inlay. Overhead; arching ceiling panels, painted Nile green with their corners adorned with gold leaf fleur-de-lis, connected to handsome brass-plated luggage racks.

Portland-Lewiston Interurban luxury coach, No. 10 Arbutus with
Lewiston terminal personnel l-r two unidentified men
then; R G Weeks, master mechanic; Guy W. Mitchell, barn foreman;
H. L. Wright, Mrs. Lucy Card Matthews, E J Chateauvert, Milan H Spinney,
Charles E Kennison, L R Penny.  June 29, 1914
Collection of Barney Neuburger from O. R. Cummings


Interior of the Arbutus. You can see the fleur-de-lis in the corners
of the center ceiling panels and the interlocking rubber tile flooring.
Sister portland-Lewiston Interurban coach, No. 14, Narcissus, is
now being restored at Seashore  Trolley Museum. The Narcissus
Circa 1914 O. R. Cummings Collection

The short video below has the audio of Clyde Walker Pierce, Jr. talking about his experience with trolleys in southern Maine, and his recollection of "racing" the PLI interurbans with his automobile in the early 1930s.


Freight cars (Main Type #2)

Combination car (Subset #8)
Combination cars were cars that had one or more compartments for passengers and a separate compartment for baggage, mail, and luggage.

Combination car No. 3 was built in 1897 for the Portland
& Yarmouth Elec. Rwy. and in 1900 became part of the
Portland Railroad and was later converted to a box motor
express car. A combine or combination car was designed
to handle express or light freight and also carry passengers.
One portion of the car has a separate compartment for freight,
usually with a sliding door on one or both sides of the body
with the remaining car compartment with seats for carrying
passengers. Combines were commonly used on rural lines.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library;
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_26_016


Combination Car No. 51 of the Atlantic Shore Railway as
seen on Bickford Island at the end of the line
in Cape Porpoise circa summer 1915.
Image Harold Jellison among O. R. Cummings collection

Granville "Granny" Allen seen here in the vestibule of 1912
combination car of the Aroostook Valley Railroad  No. 71.
No photo credit is given in the publication.

Granville "Granny" Allen at work inside No. 71.
R. L. Day photo in the
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_3_046

Seen here, 1912 Aroostook Valley Railroad Company No. 70, 
the sister combination car to No. 71 in the above images.
 No. 70 is at Seashore Trolley Museum. 
Image September 26, 2009. No. 70 is listed in

Mail car (Subset #9)
Mail cars, or post office cars, were closed cars used exclusively for the transportation of mail. Some cars carried mail in closed pouches, but some cars fitted out with racks and tables for sorting the mail en route.
The mail was transported from the post office to substations where it was collected and delivered by postal carriers.
Not all Maine electric railways had mail cars in service.

1904, U. S. Mail car No. 108 also carried Express. No. 108
is among the collection of Maine railway vehicles at
Seashore Trolley Museum and is listed in the
O. R. Cummingds Collection

Railway Mail Service clerk Charles Preston sorts letters in
the postal compartment of No. 108 somewhere between
Badger's Island and York beach. circa 1910
O. R. Cummings Collection

Loading mail on No. 71 at Washburn, July 1945.
1912 Aroostook Valley Railroad passenger & freight
interurban, No. 71 is at Seashore Trolley Museum.
R. L. Day photo in the
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_3_031

Original mail car "A" of the Portsmouth, Kittery & York
Street Railway at York Beach circa 1899.
O. R. Cummings Collection

Box freight (Subset #10)
Box freight cars were closed, self-propelled cars used for carrying freight and pulling trans of cars. 

Auburn & Turner Railroad No. 4 Box freight rail
car on September 10, 1905.
Staples spur was near the end of the line in Turner
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_10_035

Unnumbered steel flat car with No. 108 Box Express car on 
State Street in Bangor handling/installing wooden poles. 1925
Image from the Edwin "Bill" Robertson Coll. PWM

Portland Railroad No. 4 express motor car was built in 1909
was converted to a wrecker car in its later years. Seen here at
the Deering Carbarn in June 1938. Express cars carried freight.
Image  Edwin "Bill" Robertson Coll. PWM

Motor cars (Subset #11)
Motor cars were self-propelled flat cars as opposed to non-motorized rail cars.
Unlike locomotives, motor cars had space to carry freight.

Atlantic Shore Line Railway flat motor car on the left,
with an enclosed cab on each end of the car. It's
coupled up, attached to, No. 106, box trailer built in
1906, serves as a line car during some construction
on the Kennebunk-York Beach line. Image circa 1908
O. R. Cummings Collection

At York Beach, Atlantic Express Company delivery wagon
and Atlantic Shore Railway box motor car exchange
goods. Circa 1912. O. R. Cummings Collection

Switching freight at East Corinth on the Charleston line
in the early days of the Bangor Railway & Electric is 1897
box-express motor built in 1897 for the Bangor, Hampden &
Winterport Railway.
Image from Charles D. Heseltine Collection

Gondola car (Subset #12)
Gondola cars had sides and ends, but no roof. They were used to haul coal, ballast, and other rough bulk freight.

Freight and Express were important sources of revenue. Here,
gondola motor No. 652 of the Androscoggin & Kennebec
Railway in Lewiston is at the Bates College heating
plant in Lewiston in 1935. Photo by Roger Borrup in
O. R. Cummings Collection

Locomotive (Subset #13)
Locomotives were tractors that did not carry freight or passengers.
Electric locomotives were used by interurban roads for hauling trains of freight cars.

No. 90, an electric locomotive, steeple cab type,
 of the Portland-Lewiston interurban, hauling two flatcars,
loaded with railroad ties at the Deering Junction register
station in Portland. Image circa 1920.
O. R. Cummings Collection

Electric locomotive No. 100 hauling a train of railroad boxcars
passing the Goodall Mills in Sanford. Probably en route to the
railroad station in Springvale. Image circa 1935. No. 100
is a steeple cab type locomotive that was built in 1906.
Seashore Tolley Museum acquired it in 1949 and it has been
fully restored. O. R. Cummings Collection

No. 100 at Seashore Trolley Museum and is listed in the

Baggage car (Subset #14)
Baggage cars were closed cars that were used to carry the passengers' luggage.

Aroostook Valley Railroad baggage-express box motor
No 52. The caption reads: This picture was taken by the
General Electric engineers and was used for many years
in advertising in trade magazines. It shows the frame and
mounting for the air controlled "Nose Plow".
Photo from the book, "Aroostook Valley Railroad:
History of the Potaoland Interurban in Northern
Maine" by Charles D. Heseltine & Edwin B. Robertson.
1909 AVR No. 52, is at Seashore Trolley Museum
and has been listed in the National

Utility cars (Main Type #3)

Wedge plow (Subset #15)
A wedge plow was a snowplow with a large wedge-shaped plow mounted to the front of the car.
They were also equipped with side wings.

Snowplows were very important to keeping the railways operating consistently through the Maine winters. As an example, Portland Railroad had more than 20 plows in the railway fleet, plus 4 rotary plows, sweepers and other equipment that could move snow away from the tracks.

Early snow-fighting equipment for the Old Town line
Image from Charles D. Heseltine Collection

At the remnants of the Fairfield carbarn, Waterville, Fairfield
& Oakland Street Railway No. 6  is a single-truck, double pole
shear snowplow. 1936 - Edwin "Bill" Robertson Coll. PWM

February 1939 on the Westbrook line, No. 15, a single-truck
shear snowplow of the Portland Railroad.
Image  Edwin "Bill" Robertson Coll. PWM

Portland Railroad's No. 2 is a single-truck shear snowplow car
Affectionately called a nose plow, No. 2 was built in 1898 for
the Portland & Yarmouth Electric Railway and became part
of the Portland Railroad in 1900. Image September 1939 at
St. John Street shops. Edwin "Bill" Robertson Coll. PWM

Portland Railroad's No. 17 double-truck, double pole, arch roof
shear snow plow in October 1939 at the St. John Street shop. 
Edwin "Bill" Robertson Coll. PWM

Portland Railroad's No. M-1, 1903, single-truck, single-pole,
shear snowplow was purchased used from Eastern Mass. St. Rwy. 
Image October 1938 - Edwin "Bill" Robertson Coll. PWM

Rotary plow (Subset #16)
A rotary plow was a snowplow with a large revolving screw cutter mounted in front that bored through deep snowdrifts, discharging the snow to one side through a chute.
Street railways used rotary snowplows in regions with extreme winter weather to clear drifts of snow that were too deep for wedge snow plows to handle.

No. M-6, a 1901 Ruggles Co., 8-wheel, double-truck rotary
snowblower used on the Old Town line.
Image from the Edwin "Bill" Robertson Coll. PWM

No. 1, four-wheel rotary snow plow built for the Portland &
Yarmouth StreetRailwayElec. Rwy in 1899.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library;
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_26_005

Snow sweeper (Subset #17)
Snow sweepers were designed to sweep snow off the street railway track, typically during light snowfalls.
The sweeper was a closed car, mounted high on a single truck. Beneath the floor of the car, at each end, rotating brooms made of flexible Ratten sticks were set at an angle of about 45-degrees to the centerline to throw the snow to one side of the track.

Portland Railroad's No. 03 on Congress Street is a "Root"
scraper (sweeper car) that would be used  to clear snow from
the tracks. Originally,  No. 03 was an express car for the
Portland & Yarmouth Rwy.  It was built in 1897.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_32_073

Portland Railroad's single-truck sweeper car, No. 02, at the
Deering Carbarn in a new coat of paint and with new "brooms!"
received in the St. John Street shops. September 1935
Edwin "Bill" Robertson Coll. PWM

Portland Railroad's single-truck sweeper car, No. 02,
 was built in 1920. Seen here in Congress Square, Portland
in December 1927.  Edwin "Bill" Robertson Coll. PWM

Tower car (Subset #18)
Tower cars - or line cars - were cars that strung up and maintained the trolley wires that powered the cars.
Tower cars were equipped with a tower or elevating platform that allowed linemen to reach the electrical wires overhead.

Tower car stringing up the first overhead wire in
Central Square, Gorham, ME - June 1901
J. A. Waterman Glass Plate Negative Collection


No. 28 was a passenger car on the Lewiston, Brunswick &
Bath line. It was converted to an overhead maintenance
work car. Seen here at the corner of Elm and
Lewiston Streets in Mechanic Falls
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_10_020

Work car (Subset #19)
A work car was a trolley assigned to maintenance and support of the track and overhead electric wires.
Work cars came in a variety of forms, some built specifically as work cars and others converted from retired passenger trolleys.

Line car no. 702 is shown in front of the Lewiston carbarn
on Lisbon Street while lineman makes some minor repairs on
the overhead trolley wire. Photo by Roger Borrup on
June 30, 1937, in the O. R. Cummings Collection

Former U. S. Mail and Express car No. 108 was purchased in
1904 for use by the Portsmouth, Dover & York Street Railway.
It served as an overhead line maintenance work car for YUCo.
No. 108 was acquired by Seashore Trolley Museum in 1949
for historic preservation. No. 108 underwent exterior restoration
work in the early 1980s, returning it to its U. S. Mail service
look.  No. 108 is in need of additional major restoration.
O. R. Cummings Collection

Here is No. 108 in use at a special event at Seashore
Trolley Museum after it was restored back to being a U.S.
Mail car (RPO- Railway Post Office)/Express car. It is

Service Car M-8 was an electric railway street sprinkler car
for the Bangor Hydro-Electric Company. Image circa 1935
Charles D. Heseltine Collection

Crane car (Subset #20)
A crane car was a flat car equipped with a pilar crane used to handle rails and heavy construction material. Crane cars were useful in dealing with derailments and wrecks of trolley cars.

Crane Car No. 1000 of the Portland Railroad is shown as
a wing plow clearing snow from Route 1 along the tracks
between South Portland and Saco. Image circa 1925
O R Cummings Collection

Click Here for the Ninety Communities in Maine had Electric Railway Service!

Sources
Images credited accordingly
Cummings, O. R.  publications:
1950 Re-issued January 1957 - "Atlantic Shore Line Railway"
1955 - "Toonervilles of Maine: The Pine Tree State"
1956 - "The Biddeford and Saco Railroad"
1956 - "The Portland-Lewiston Interurban"
Part 1, 1957, and Part 2, 1959 - "Portland Raod"
1959 - "Trolley Parlor Cars of New England" 
1964 - "Trolleys To York Beach: The Portsmouth Dover & York Street Railway"
1966 - "Atlantic Shore Trolleys"
1966 - "Trolleys to Brunswick, Maine 1896-1937"
1967 - "Portland-Lewiston Interurban"
1969 - "Lewiston, Augusta & Waterville Street Railway"
1969 - "Trolleys to Augusta, Maine"
1983 - Insert for the newsletter of The 470 Club
1989 - "Street Cars to Old Orchard Beach"
Cummings, O. R., Collection at Seashore Trolley Museum Library, Kennebunkport, Maine
Day, Ralph - 1946 - "Aroostook Valley Railroad Company history"
Heseltine, Charles D. - 1974 - "Bangor Street Railway"
Hitt, Rodney. Electric Railway Dictionary. New York: McGraw Publishing Company, 1911.
2012 - "The Trolley Parks of Maine" -  by New England Electric Railway Historical Society
2015 - "The Illustrated Atlas of Maine's Street & Electric Railways 1863-1946" -  by New England Electric Railway Historical Society

Museum of Mass Transit is celebrating its 81st Birthday year in 2020! 
Special Events are scheduled  - Public operations start on May 2, 2020. 
Click Here for the 2019 Events & Special Activities for the 80th Anniversary Season, with hot links

Click Here for 2019 Special Events 

Check out the new book that features the Narcissus!
Look below to read the many great reviews!

Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride

Three 5-Star Reviews from Readers' Favorite posted on January 6, 2020
Click Here to read the post

"An eye-opening and entertaining ride - you won't want the train to stop!
Highly recommended.
Andrew Vietze, award-winning author of Becoming Teddy Roosevelt.

Books are available at these local bookstores in Maine:
The Book Review, Falmouth
The Bookworm, Gorham
Letterpress Books, Portland
Nonesuch Books and More, South Portland
Nubble Books, Biddeford
Seashore Trolley Museum, Kennebunkport
Sherman's Maine Coast Book Shops - All locations

A resource for teachers. 
     We are working with the Maine Historical Society to create State-standard-based lesson plans for classroom use in grades 4, 5, 6, and 7. We hope to have the vocabulary for the various grades released soon and to unveil the full lesson plans early in 2020. In the meantime, the teacher resource post has a listing of online references for people, places, and events that are referred to throughout the book, Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride - written with a focus on using vocabulary words and sentence structure that might be useful in classroom studies for students and teachers in grades 4 to 7. Though, there are numerous words, sentences, topics, and references that students and teachers in a variety of grades, as well as readers of all ages, will find useful and of interest. 

Click Here for the announcement of the award-winning narrator for the audiobook :) 

     Millie Thayer is a headstrong farmer's daughter who chases her dreams in a way you would expect a little girl nicknamed "Spitfire would-running full tilt and with her eyes on the stars. Dreaming of leaving the farm life, working in the city, and fighting for women's right to vote, Millie imagines flying away on a magic carpet. One day, that flying carpet shows up in the form of an electric trolley that cuts across her farm. A fortune-teller predicts that Millie's path will cross that of someone famous. Suddenly, she finds herself caught up in events that shake the nation, Maine, and her family. Despairing that her dreams may be shattered, Millie learns, in an unexpected way, that dreams can be shared.

The paperback edition of Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride can be purchased online through the Seashore Trolley Museum's store website. Books purchased through the Museum's website directly benefit the Museum and the Narcissus project. Amazon book purchases also benefit the Museum and the Narcissus.

Click Here to go to the Museum Store webpage to order online

Click Here to go to the Amazon page to order the book online

Click Here to go to the ebook Kindle page through Amazon

Click Here for the post on the ebook release video with a guided tour of the Narcissus

Book, ebook, and (soon) audiobook available through Amazon.

Click Here to read January 24, 2020 - Four-Star Clarion Review

Click Here to read January 20, 2020 - Coveted Starred Blueink Review

Click Here to read January 19, 2020 - Theodore Roosevelt Center Blog Post Review

Click Here to read the December 25, 2019 4-Stars out of 4-Stars Review through OnlineBookClub

     In June of 2018, I was very happy to release a blog post announcing that award-winning Maine author, Jean M. Flahive, had agreed to write a young reader historical fiction chapter book that would benefit the Narcissus Project. In October of 2019, I was happy to report, that the book, Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride, had been printed and was available to purchase! Below are some blurbs/reviews from a few individuals who read the manuscript after being professionally edited by Maine Authors Publishing in Thomaston, Maine. 

MUST-READ! - Click Here
Here is an example of how donations to the Narcissus Project now will help with the interpretation portion of the project. The interpretation programming will include exhibits, displays, education programming. During 2019, through generous donations to the Narcissus Project, we were able to conserve, replicate, and have high resolutions digital image files made of the original, 1910, 25.5-foot long, surveyor map of the elevation and grade of the 30-mile private right-of-way of the Portland, Gray, and Lewiston Railroad (Portland-Lewiston Interurban)
MUST-READ! - Click Here  (In case you hadn't "clicked" and read it above :)

Please Consider a Donation to the Narcissus Project
to help us tell the incredible story of the Narcissus through the interpretation portion of the Narcissus Project.
Thank You

   Inside the Donald G. Curry Town House Restoration Shop, the Narcissus is in the midst of major work as we strive to complete its restoration. With our estimate to have the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Narcissus in the fall of 2021, we are now planning the interpretation portion of the Narcissus Project. Donations to the Narcissus Project may be used in the future to help tell the incredible 100-plus-year-old story of the Narcissus. Your donation to the Narcissus is helping to make the dream of the project's success, a reality.

See below for Donation options -
It starts with YOU
Your Donation Matters
Make a Donation TODAY

Please Help the Narcissus. 
Donation Options to Help the Narcissus Project:

The New England Electric Railway Historical Society (NEERHS)
is the 501c3 organization that owns and operates the Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, ME and the National Streetcar
The NEERHS is registered with the IRS (EIN# 01-0244457) and was incorporated in Maine in 1941.

Check or Money Order ***** should be made payable to:
New England Electric Railway Historical Society (NEERHS)
In the memo please write: Narcissus Fund 816-A
Mail to: Seashore Trolley Museum
              P. O. Box A
              Kennebunkport, ME 04046

Credit Card ***** donations can be a one-time donation or you
may choose to have a specific amount charged to your card
automatically on a monthly basis. Please contact the Museum bookkeeper, Connie, via email at finance@NEERHS.org or by phone, 207-967-2712 ext. 5.

Online Donations - may be made by using a Credit Card: 
Click Here to make an online donation through the Museum's website - When at the Donation page: Fill in donor info, etc., when at "To which fund are you donating? Scroll down to "Other" and type in: 816-A Narcissus, then continue on filling in the required information.

Click Here for PayPal - to make an online donation: you can use email: finance@NEERHS.org and in the message box write:
For Narcissus fund 816-A

Donation of Securities ***** We also accept donations of
securities. You can contact the Museum bookkeeper, Connie, via email at finance@NEERHS.org or by phone, 207-967-2712 ext. 5,
for brokerage account information for accepting donated securities.

BONUS ***** If you work for a company/corporation that will
"match" an employee's donation to an approved 501c3 non-profit
educational organization, please be sure to complete the necessary paperwork with your employer so that your donation is matched :)

Questions? ***** Please contact Narcissus project manager:
Phil Morse, pmorse31@gmail.com or call 207-985-9723 - cell.

Thank You :)

Thank You for our Current Funding Partners
20th Century Electric Railway Foundation - 2018 - Major Gift, 2017/2014 Matching Grants
Renaissance Charitable Foundation (LPCT) by Fiduciary Trust Charitable Giving Fund
Mass Bay RRE - 2018 Railroad Preservation Grant 
Thornton Academy (Saco, ME) - Staff & Alumni - Matching Grant Challenge 2014
New England Electric Railway Historical Society (Kennebunkport, ME) - Member Donations
Amherst Railway Society - 2015 Heritage Grant
National Railway Historical Society - 2016 & 2015 Heritage Preservation Grants
Enterprise Holding Foundation - 2015 Community Grant
Theodore Roosevelt Association - Member Donations
John Libby Family Association and Member Donations
* The Conley Family - In Memory of Scott Libbey 2018/2017/2016/2015
* The W. S. Libbey Family - Awalt, Conley, Graf, Holman, Libbey, McAvoy, McLaughlin, Meldrum, O'Halloran, Salto, - 2018/2017
* The Hughes Family 2017/2016/2010
New Gloucester Historical Society and Member Donations
Gray Historical Society and Member Donations
Gray Public Library Association - Pat Barter Speaker Series
* LogMein - Matching Employee Donation
* IBM - Matching Employee/Retiree Donations
* Fidelity Charitable Grant - Matching Employee Donations
* Richard E. Erwin Grant - 2017/2016

The Narcissus, with interior back-lit, stained glass windows are majestic.
Make a donation today to help restore the interior of this Maine gem.
Help Theodore Roosevelt's Maine Ride get back on track! Once restored,
you will be able to ride in luxury on this National Register Treasure at
Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, Maine.
PWM photo

Please Consider Making a Donation to the project of the National Register of Historic Places member, Narcissus. We are currently raising funds to tell the incredible story of this Maine gem.

Various News stories during the summer of 2015 about the
Narcissus and its connection to Theodore Roosevelt. TR
was a passenger on the Narcissus on August 18, 1914.

Click Here to See the list of All Previous Blog Posts - Index

The Narcissus - July 31, 2015. Make a donation today.
Help Theodore Roosevelt's Maine Ride get back on track!
Once restored, you will be able to ride in luxury on this
Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, Maine.