Thursday, January 31, 2019

Maine Bicentennial Series - The Norway & Paris Street Railway 1894-1918

During 1907, this, single-truck, combination
baggage-passenger car (originally No. 12) was acquired from
the Rockland, Thomaston, & Camden Street Railway,
by the Norway and Paris Street Railway and became No. 7.
Photo from O.R. Cummings 1955 publication,
Toonervilles of Maine: The Pine Tree State

Here is the newest release in the Maine Bicentennial series of electric railways in Maine. This blog post features the summary of the Norway and Paris Street Railway as written by O. R. Cummings in his 1955 book, Toonervilles of Maine: The Pine Tree State
Additional photos will be credited accordingly. This material is taken from a copy of Toonervilles of Maine book acquired by this blogger.

Click Here for the post: Ninety Communities in Maine had Electric Railway Service!
Click Here for the post: 57 Million Passengers Carried on Electric Railways in Maine in 1915!
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - History of the Portland Railroad 1860-1941
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - History of the Calais Street Railway 1894-1929
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - History of Aroostook Valley Railroad 1909-1946
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - Fryeburg Horse Railroad 1887-1913
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - Skowhegan & Norridgewock Railway 1894-1903
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - Benton and Fairfield Railway 1898-1928
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - The Somerset Traction Company 1895-1928
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - The Fairfield and Shawmut Railway 1903-1927
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - Waterville, Fairfield, & Oakland Rwy 1887-1937
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - Trolleys to Augusta, Maine 1889-1932
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - Rockland, South Thomaston, & St. George Rwy
Click Here for post: Maine Bicentennial series - Rockland, Thomaston, & Camden St.Rwy. '92-1931

Seashore Trolley Museum, the Museum of Mass Transit in Kennebunkport, Maine, is celebrating its 80th Birthday year in 2019! Many events are scheduled and many more will be scheduled before the opening of public operations on May 4, 2019. 

Maine's Shortest Trolley line was the Norway and Paris Street Railway
     which, from 1895 to 1918, connected South Paris, the seat of Oxford County, with the neighboring town of Norway, a little more than two miles away.
     Chartered on November 14, 1894 under the provisions of Chapter 268 of the Public Laws of 1893, the Norway and Paris had been organized on April 25th of that year by George L. Beal and Freeland Howe, both of Norway; George E. Macomber, J. Manchester Haynes, John F. Hill, and Orville Baker, all of Augusta, and Herbert L. Shepherd of Rockport. 
     At the same time, Mssrs. Macomber, Haynes, and Shepherd were directors of the Rockland, Thomaston, and Camden Street Railway and Macomber, Haynes, and Hill were on the directorate of the Augusta, Hallowell, and Gardiner Railroad, later absorbed into the extensive Lewiston, Augusta, and Waterville system.
     The new company was capitalized at $10,000 (later increased to $25,000) and its first officials included Freeland Howe, president; H. L. Shepherd, treasurer, and John F. Hill, clerk of the corporation. Directors included the three officers and the other incorporators of the road.
     The proposed route of the Norway and Paris, approved by the Railroad commissioners on January 1, 1895, began at Pleasant and Main Streets in Norway, continued through Main Street, to Paris Street and ran along Paris Street, first on the left and then on the right side of the road, to south Paris Square, terminating opposite the old Andrews Hotel. There were to be two grade crossings of the Grand Trunk Railway; one across the Norway branch on Paris Street, near the Norway-Paris town line, and the second across the Grand Trunk's main line, near the South Paris depot.

Norway & Paris Street Railway map - 2.1 miles total trackage
Map created by Charles D. Heseltine - from 
the NEERHS 2015 book, "The Illustrated Atlas of
Maine's Street & Electric Railways 1863-1946."

     Construction began in the late spring of 1895, the work being done by a contractor. Forty-five-pound T-rail was used in building the 2.13-mile line and the overhead was of both side bracket and span wire suspension, there being 1.07-mile of the former and 1.06-mile of the latter. A turnout was provided near the Agricultural building at the Oxford County Fairgrounds in South Paris.
     A two-track brick carhouse, with a wooden office building adjoining, was erected on Paris Street, Norway, and four single-truck passenger cars - two open and two closed - were purchased. Arrangements were made to purchase power from the Norway Electric Light Company which operated a combination steam and hydroelectric plant.

Norway and Paris Street Railway carhouse in Norway.
Photo from O.R. Cummings 1955 publication,
Toonervilles of Maine: The Pine Tree State

Operation
     With construction nearly completed in late June, the management made plans to commence operations as soon as possible and on June 28, the Railroad Commissioners issued a certificate of safety for the trackage from Norway Village to the South Paris depot. Regular service began July 1, with M. W. Sampson of Norway and Frank A. Taylor of South Paris, conductors, and John D. Cole of Norway and C. F. Penley of South Paris, motormen, as the first crews. F. B. Lee was general manager and superintendent of the railway.
     The certificate of safety for the balance of the line - from South Paris depot to South Paris Square - was received on August 2nd and through operations between Norway Village and South Paris Square began the following day.
     Under the schedule set up by the company, cars left the head of Maine Street, Norway, on the hour and half hour and hour. A five-cent fare was charged and the running time was about 15 minutes.
     One car was enough to maintain base service on the line, with two or three cars being placed in operation during Oxford County Fair week in the fall. The U. S. Mail was carried from the South Paris depot to the Norway post office and, in addition, the N&P carried on a small package and express business. In later years, a second turnout was built near the South Paris depot.
     Several attractions were offered by the railway to include patronage of the trolleys. On a warm evening in June 1896, a small orchestra rode aboard one of the cars and in 1897, the company purchased a pine grove about midway between the two towns and created "Electra Park", later renamed "Central Park". This area contained an outdoor theatre with seats for several hundred people, a croquet lot, an electric fountain with colored lights and refreshment stands. In later years, motion picture shows were presented at the theatre.

A sign advertising Electra Park is carried on the roof of
one of the 10-bench opens of Norway and Paris St. Rwy
in South Paris. Photo from O.R. Cummings 1955 publication,
Toonervilles of Maine: The Pine Tree State

Rolling Stock
     The original passenger equipment of the Norway and Paris Street Railway consisted of two 10-bench open and two 20-foot closed single-truck cars, believed to have been built by the Briggs Carriage Company of Amesbury, MA. The closed cars were numbered 3 and 4 and the open cars, 5 and 6.

No. 3 of the Norway and Paris at the carhouse in Norway.
 Photo from Charles C. Holt in O.R. Cummings
1955 publication, Toonervilles of Maine: The Pine Tree State

     There were only four motors and they were placed under the open cars in summer and under the closed cars during cars during other seasons of the year. The trucks, of Bemis manufacture, may also have been exchanged between the two types of cars.
     Pictorial evidence indicates that No. 3 may have been a former horsecar rebuilt for electric service as its roof type was characteristic of horsecar construction.
     Closed cars were painted Pullman green and the open cars were yellow in color.

No. 6 open car of the Norway and Paris Street Railway near
the carhouse in Norway. 
Photo from O.R. Cummings 1955 publication,
Toonervilles of Maine: The Pine Tree State

     A third closed car was purchased in 1900. This was No. 2 and was of the 20-foot box-type, with a steam coach roof and equipped with a Peckham truck. It was on the property only a few months, subsequently being sold to the Augusta, Hallowell, and Gardiner Railroad.
     During 1907, a single-truck passenger-baggage combination car, No. 7, built by Briggs, was acquired from the Rockland, Thomaston, and Camden Street Railway. Later, one of the original closed cars was retired and a second No. 2 - this a single-truck closed car with home-built vestibules - was purchased from an unknown source.

The original No. 2 of the Norway and Paris at the Norway
carhouse. Photo from Charles C. Holt in O.R. Cummings
1955 publication, Toonervilles of Maine: The Pine Tree State

     For snow fighting in winter, there was a four-wheel, home-made contraption with a nose plow mounted on one end. This rig, properly weighted down, was pushed by one or both of the closed cars when necessary to clear the line and old-timers relate that it frequently derailed. Also, there was no place to turn it around.

The home-built snow plow of the Norway and Paris Street
Railway at the Norway carhouse.
Photo from Ernest R. Rowe in O.R. Cummings
1955 publication, Toonervilles of Maine: The Pine Tree State

Power
     The equipment at the power station of the Norway Electric Light Company, later the Oxford Light Company, consisted of one 75Kw. Thompson-Houston 600-volts d.c. generator belted to a jackshaft driven by either a water wheel or steam engine, An 1,100 volt 60 cycle alternator was belted to the same jackshaft that drove the railway generator. A second alternator was driven by a Corliss steam engine.
     In addition to the Norway plant, there was a small hydro-electric station, owned by the Maine Power Company, at South Paris. This station was equipped with a 75Kw. 600-volt d.c. generator and a small alternator, both driven by a water wheel through a single jackshaft.
     The alternators at the Norway and South Paris plants were used to provide electricity for house lighting in the two towns.

One of the 10-bench Briggs opens near the end of the line
in Norway Villiage.
Photo from Ernest R. Rowe in O.R. Cummings
1955 publication, Toonervilles of Maine: The Pine Tree State

Financial and Corporate
     During its first year of operation, the Norway and Paris carried 177,102 passengers who paid fares totaling $8,103.93. Operating expenses were $4,445.51, leaving a net operating income of $3,658.42/ Miscellaneous revenues were @202.71, producing a gross income above operating expenses of $3,861.13. From this were deducted an advance of $2,136.77 to the building contractor and a five percent dividend on the common stock, leaving a surplus of $474.36.
     Operations in 1897 and early 1898 were also profitable but for the year ended June 30, 1899, there was a deficit of $943.21. From then on, the railway followed a pattern of having a deficit one year and a profit the next - neither very large and about balancing each other out as time passed.
     F. B. Lee was succeeded by W. J. Jones of Norway as general manager and superintendent in 1900 and in 1903, Mr. Jones was replaced by H. B. Young. Mr. Young remained with the railway until its abandonment.
     The Norway Electric Light Company, owned by the same parties as the Norway and Paris, changed its name to the Oxford Light Company on February 3, 1897, and on December 27, 1904, the lighting company was merged with the street railway. The latter increased its capitalization $50,000 and floated a second mortgage of $20,000, due in 1925. In addition, it assumed the $80,000 funded debt of the Oxford Light Company.
     Freeland Howe, president and one of the founders of the Norway and Paris, died in 1912 and was succeeded in the presidency by the late Guy P. Gannett, owner of a chain of newspapers in the Pine Tree State. During the following year, the railway came under the control of the Central Maine Power Company and Maynard S. Bird of Rockland was named the president. William T. Cobb, also of Rockland, became president in 1915.
     The Norway and Paris absorbed the Maine Power Company on May 29, 1914, and 18 months later, on January 6, 1916, the name of the Norway and Paris Street Railway was changed to the Oxford Electric Company.
     The new management immediately undertook the task of rehabilitating the railway to bring it up to the standards of the other traction properties of the central Maine Power Company. During 1915, nine hundred feet of the original 45-pound rail was replaced with 70-pound steel and 600 new ties were installed. A 15-foot by 60-foot addition to the carhouse, for the storage of electrical supplies, was constructed. In 1916, 2,482 feet of track were relaid with new 70-pound rail and 986 new ties were installed. Additional improvements were carried out in 1917 - and plans were made to acquire new rolling stock for the line. Unfortunately, this never came to pass.

Abandonment
     The rise in prices which accompanied World War I had its effect on the Norway and Paris. Operating expenses increased rapidly without a corresponding boost in revenues. But the railway might have kept on had it not been for the winter of 1917-18 when trolley service was suspended for several months because of deep snow blocking the tracks. Operations resumed in the spring but the cars ran only a short time thereafter, abandonment taking place on October 5, 1918. The decision to discontinue railway service was apparently made to avoid losses which would have to be charged against the profitable electricity business.
     Attempts were made to induce the Oxford Electric Company to resume trolley operations in the spring of 1919 but Central Maine Power vetoed the idea. During the summer, the rails were torn up, the overhead was removed and the cars were junked. So far as Norway and Paris were concerned, the electric railway was thing of the past.

A 2007 publication by O. R. Cummings and Peter C. Hammond; Norway & Paris Street Railway - The Shortest Streetcar Line in The State of Maine 1895-1918 is a very comprehensive history of the line containing dozens and dozens of photos, copies of advertising, and statistics for all the years in service.
     
Click on: "Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride," to learn about the young reader historical fiction chapter book due for release this fall. Proceeds will benefit the Narcissus Project :)

Please Consider a Donation to the Narcissus Project
to help us tell the incredible story of the Narcissus through the interpretation portion of the Narcissus Project.
Thank You

   Inside the Donald G. Curry Town House Restoration Shop, the Narcissus is in the midst of major work as we strive to complete its restoration. With our estimate to have the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Narcissus in the fall of 2021, we are now planning the interpretation portion of the Narcissus Project. Donations to the Narcissus Project may be used in the future to help tell the incredible 100-plus-year-old story of the Narcissus. Your donation to the Narcissus is helping to make the dream of the project's success, a reality.

The 2015 publication of, The Illustrated Atlas
of Maine's Street & Electric Railways
1863-1946, was published by the Library
at Seashore Trolley Museum, Kennebunkport.
Copies are available for purchase from the

Seashore Trolley Museum, - Museum of Mass Transit, is celebrating its 80th Birthday year in 2019! 
Special Events are scheduled  - Public operations start on May 4, 2019. 
Click Here for the 2019 Events & Special Activities for the 80th Anniversary Season, with hot links

Click Here for 2019 Special Events 


Click Here for 80th Anniversary Year - Seashore Trolley Museum 1939-2019 post
Click Here for the post - 80th Anniversary Year -A Look Back at the 50s - Seashore Trolley Mus.
Click Here for the post - 80th Anniversary Year - A Look Back at the 60s  - Seashore Trolley Mus.
Click Here for the post - 80th Anniversary Year -A Look Back at the '70s - Seashore Trolley Mus.
Click Here for The Birth of Seashore Trolley Museum Blog Post
Click Here for STM's Ten National Register of Historic Places Electric Railway Vehicles post
Click Here for 1901 Tower C Boston Elevated Railway to STM in 1975
Click Here for No. 38 - 1906 Manchester & Nashua Street Railway - Acquired March 21, 1940
Click Here for No. 60 - 1895 Manchester Street Railway - Acquired April 11, 1941
Click Here for No. 4387 - 1918 Eastern Mass. Street Railway - Acquired August 29, 1946
Click Here for No. 100 - 1906 Atlantic Shore Line Railway - Acquired 1949
Click Here for No. 108 - 1904 Portsmouth, Dover & York Street Railway - Acquired 1949
Click Here for No. 14 Narcissus 1912 Portland-Lewiston Interurban - Acquired 1969

See below for Donation options -

It starts with YOU
Your Donation Matters
Make a Donation TODAY

Please Help the Narcissus. 

Donation Options to Help the Narcissus Project:


The New England Electric Railway Historical Society (NEERHS)
is the 501c3 organization that owns and operates the Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, ME and the National Streetcar
The NEERHS is registered with the IRS (EIN# 01-0244457) and was incorporated in Maine in 1941.

Check or Money Order ***** should be made payable to:
New England Electric Railway Historical Society (NEERHS)
In the memo please write: Narcissus Fund 816-A
Mail to: Seashore Trolley Museum
              P. O. Box A
              Kennebunkport, ME 04046

Credit Card ***** donations can be a one-time donation or you
may choose to have a specific amount charged to your card
automatically on a monthly basis. Please contact the Museum bookkeeper, Connie, via email at finance@NEERHS.org or by phone, 207-967-2712 ext. 5.

Online Donations - may be made by using a Credit Card: 
Click Here to make an online donation through the Museum's website - When at the Donation page: Fill in donor info, etc., when at "To which fund are you donating? Scroll down to "Other" and type in: 816-A Narcissus, then continue on filling in the required information.

Click Here for PayPal - to make an online donation: you can use email: finance@NEERHS.org and in the message box write:
For Narcissus fund 816-A

Donation of Securities ***** We also accept donations of
securities. You can contact the Museum bookkeeper, Connie, via email at finance@NEERHS.org or by phone, 207-967-2712 ext. 5,
for brokerage account information for accepting donated securities.

BONUS ***** If you work for a company/corporation that will
"match" an employee's donation to an approved 501c3 non-profit
educational organization, please be sure to complete the necessary paperwork with your employer so that your donation is matched :)

Questions? ***** Please contact Narcissus project manager:
Phil Morse, pmorse31@gmail.com or call 207-985-9723 - cell.

Thank You :)

Thank You for our Current Funding Partners
20th Century Electric Railway Foundation - 2018 - Major Gift, 2017/2014 Matching Grants
Mass Bay RRE - 2018 Railroad Preservation Grant 
Thornton Academy (Saco, ME) - Staff & Alumni - Matching Grant Challenge 2014
New England Electric Railway Historical Society (Kennebunkport, ME) - Member Donations
Amherst Railway Society - 2015 Heritage Grant
National Railway Historical Society - 2016 & 2015 Heritage Preservation Grants
Enterprise Holding Foundation - 2015 Community Grant
Theodore Roosevelt Association - Member Donations
John Libby Family Association and Member Donations
* The Conley Family - In Memory of Scott Libbey 2018/2017/2016/2015
* The W. S. Libbey Family - Awalt, Conley, Graf, Holman, Libbey, McAvoy, McLaughlin, Meldrum, O'Halloran, Salto, - 2018/2017
* The Hughes Family 2017/2016/2010
New Gloucester Historical Society and Member Donations
Gray Historical Society and Member Donations
Gray Public Library Association - Pat Barter Speaker Series
* LogMein - Matching Employee Donation
* IBM - Matching Employee/Retiree Donations
* Fidelity Charitable Grant - Matching Employee Donations
* Richard E. Erwin Grant - 2017/2016

The Narcissus, with interior back-lit, stained glass windows are majestic.
Make a donation today to help restore the interior of this Maine gem.
Help Theodore Roosevelt's Maine Ride get back on track! Once restored,
you will be able to ride in luxury on this National Register Treasure at
Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, Maine.
PWM photo

Please Consider Making a Donation to the project of the National Register of Historic Places member, Narcissus. We are currently raising funds to tell the incredible story of this Maine gem.

Various News stories during the summer of 2015 about the
Narcissus and its connection to Theodore Roosevelt. TR
was a passenger on the Narcissus on August 18, 1914.

Click Here to See the list of All Previous Blog Posts - Index

The Narcissus - July 31, 2015. Make a donation today.
Help Theodore Roosevelt's Maine Ride get back on track!
Once restored, you will be able to ride in luxury on this
Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, Maine.

Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Maine Bicentennial Series -The Skowhegan & Norridgewock Railway 1894-1903


1894 Skowhegan and Norridgewock combination passenger
and baggage car No. 5  seen here in front of the carhouse in
Skowhegan on Island Avenue.
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_18_33

Here is the newest release in the Maine Bicentennial series of electric railways in Maine. This blog post features the summary of the Skowhegan and Norridgewock Railway as written by O. R. Cummings in his 1955 book, Toonervilles of Maine: The Pine Tree State
Additional photos will be credited accordingly. This material is taken from a copy of Toonervilles of Maine book acquired by this blogger.

Click Here for the post: Ninety Communities in Maine had Electric Railway Service!
Click Here for the post: 57 Million Passengers Carried on Electric Railways in Maine in 1915!
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - History of the Portland Railroad 1860-1941
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - History of the Calais Street Railway 1894-1929
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - History of Aroostook Valley Railroad 1909-1946
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - Fryeburg Horse Railroad 1887-1913
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - The Norway and Paris Street Railway 1894-1918
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - Benton and Fairfield Railway 1898-1928
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - The Somerset Traction Company 1895-1928
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - The Fairfield and Shawmut Railway 1903-1927
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - Waterville, Fairfield, & Oakland Rwy 1887-1937
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - Trolleys to Augusta, Maine 1889-1932
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - Rockland, South Thomaston, & St. George Rwy
Click Here for post: Maine Bicentennial series - Rockland, Thomaston, & Camden St.Rwy. '92-1931

Seashore Trolley Museum, the Museum of Mass Transit in Kennebunkport, Maine, is celebrating its 80th Birthday year in 2019! Many events are scheduled and many more will be scheduled before the opening of public operations on May 4, 2019. 

One of the shortest-lived of New England's many street railway lines
     was the Skowhegan and Norridgewock Railway and Power Company which operated only nine years - from 1894 to 1903.

Photo from O.R. Cummings 1955 publication,
Toonervilles of Maine: The Pine Tree State

     It was on August 7, 1894, that the articles of association of the Skowhegan and Norridgewock were filed and with the Railroad Commissioners for their approval. Two of the incorporators of the company were Amos F. Gerald of Fairfield and I. C. Libby of Waterville.
     The articles of association were approved on August 15, 1894, and formal organization of the company followed on August 28. W. H. Wildes of Skowhegan was named the chairman of the board of directors and president of the company while I. C. Libby became treasurer and Amos F. Gerald, general manager.
     Construction began immediately, the work being done under contract by the Worcester Construction Company of Worcester, MA, and the road was completed early in October. A certificate of safety for the 5.75 miles of track was given by the Railroad Commissioners on October 13 and operation began the following day.

O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_18_45

     The route began on Main Street in Skowhegan, crossed the tracks of the Maine Central Railroad near the Skowhegan depot and followed the country road to the MCRR (then the Somerset Railway) station in Norridgewock Village. Forty-pound T-rail was used and the overhead construction was .75 mile span wire and five miles side brackets. There were two wooden trestles, with a total length of 100 feet.

Skowhegan & Norridgewock open car in Norridgewock at
the Maine Central Depot Circa 1900
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_18_38

     A two-track carhouse, with a capacity of six cars, was located in Norridgewock. There is little information about the power plant except that it had a generator of 110 h.p. capacity driven by "hired steam power".

An open car in Norridgewock turning into the track that
leads to the Maine Central Railroad station. Circa 1900
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_18_37

     The initial rolling stock consisted of two 10-bench single-truck open car and two single-truck combination passenger-baggage cars, built by Jackson and Sharp, and one home-made snow plow. A third single truck open, also built by Jackson and Sharp, was added in 1895.

A Jackson & Sharp photograph - builder's photo of the newly
manufactured body of S&N combination car No. 5 on the
loading dock prior to being shipped to Maine in 1894.
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_18_34

     On December 2, 1896, the S&N was granted permission to build two extensions in Skowhegan, one to connect with a spur track of the Maine Central Railroad and the other to extend to the mill of the Skowhegan Pulp Company. It was supposed to haul freight between the railroad and the pulp mill. However, for some reason, the extensions were never built.
     Equipment owned by the Skowhegan and Norridgewock in 1896 included the two, single-truck combinations, three single-truck open cars, two work cars, and one snow plow. The road had only six Westinghouse motors and it was necessary to shift them from the open cars to the combines and snow plow in the fall and back to the opens in the spring.

S&N open car No. 4 at the Norridgewock depot
of the Maine Central Railroad circa 1900
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_18_39

     During 1898, the S&N purchased a plot of woodland midway between Skowhegan and Norridgewock and created a picnic grove known as "The Pines". It was hoped this park would stimulate pleasure riding on the trolleys during the summer months. Various improvements were made from time to time, a total of more than $2,000 was invested in the resort, but it never lived up to expectations.

Norridgewock with trolley tracks circa 1900
 O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_18_36

     There is some evidence that an attempt was made to start a freight business over the line in 1901 for the equipment report for 1902 lists a platform freight car and revenue for the year included $317.40 from carrying express and parcels. Most of this was undoubtedly handled in the combination cars.
     The Skowhegan and Norridgewock was not a profitable line. In 1896, there was an operating deficit of $694.29 and in 1897, the road ended the fiscal year with a profit of only $5.23. The operating deficit on June 30, 1898, was $3,254.74 and on June 30, 1899, $3,716.30. The total accrued deficit as of that date was $57,464.22. It is not surprising that the road operated at a loss because gross earnings were seldom much more than $4,000 - and the annual fixed charges alone were $3,000.
     Obviously, the road could not continue operating under such circumstances and in 1903, with a total deficit of $66,593.48 on the books, service was temporarily suspended. Attempts were made to reorganize the company but they were unsuccessful and the line was permanently abandoned in 1906. The cars were sold and the railway was dismantled.
     
Click on: "Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride," to learn about the young reader historical fiction chapter book due for release this fall. Proceeds will benefit the Narcissus Project :)

Please Consider a Donation to the Narcissus Project
to help us tell the incredible story of the Narcissus through the interpretation portion of the Narcissus Project.
Thank You

   Inside the Donald G. Curry Town House Restoration Shop, the Narcissus is in the midst of major work as we strive to complete its restoration. With our estimate to have the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Narcissus in the fall of 2021, we are now planning the interpretation portion of the Narcissus Project. Donations to the Narcissus Project may be used in the future to help tell the incredible 100-plus-year-old story of the Narcissus. Your donation to the Narcissus is helping to make the dream of the project's success, a reality.

The 2015 publication of, The Illustrated Atlas
of Maine's Street & Electric Railways
1863-1946, was published by the Library
at Seashore Trolley Museum, Kennebunkport.
Copies are available for purchase from the

Seashore Trolley Museum, - Museum of Mass Transit, is celebrating its 80th Birthday year in 2019! 
Special Events are scheduled  - Public operations start on May 4, 2019. 
Click Here for the 2019 Events & Special Activities for the 80th Anniversary Season, with hot links

Click Here for 2019 Special Events 


Click Here for 80th Anniversary Year - Seashore Trolley Museum 1939-2019 post
Click Here for the post - 80th Anniversary Year -A Look Back at the 50s - Seashore Trolley Mus.
Click Here for the post - 80th Anniversary Year - A Look Back at the 60s  - Seashore Trolley Mus.
Click Here for the post - 80th Anniversary Year -A Look Back at the '70s - Seashore Trolley Mus.
Click Here for The Birth of Seashore Trolley Museum Blog Post
Click Here for STM's Ten National Register of Historic Places Electric Railway Vehicles post
Click Here for 1901 Tower C Boston Elevated Railway to STM in 1975
Click Here for No. 38 - 1906 Manchester & Nashua Street Railway - Acquired March 21, 1940
Click Here for No. 60 - 1895 Manchester Street Railway - Acquired April 11, 1941
Click Here for No. 4387 - 1918 Eastern Mass. Street Railway - Acquired August 29, 1946
Click Here for No. 100 - 1906 Atlantic Shore Line Railway - Acquired 1949
Click Here for No. 108 - 1904 Portsmouth, Dover & York Street Railway - Acquired 1949
Click Here for No. 14 Narcissus 1912 Portland-Lewiston Interurban - Acquired 1969

See below for Donation options -

It starts with YOU
Your Donation Matters
Make a Donation TODAY

Please Help the Narcissus. 

Donation Options to Help the Narcissus Project:


The New England Electric Railway Historical Society (NEERHS)
is the 501c3 organization that owns and operates the Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, ME and the National Streetcar
The NEERHS is registered with the IRS (EIN# 01-0244457) and was incorporated in Maine in 1941.

Check or Money Order ***** should be made payable to:
New England Electric Railway Historical Society (NEERHS)
In the memo please write: Narcissus Fund 816-A
Mail to: Seashore Trolley Museum
              P. O. Box A
              Kennebunkport, ME 04046

Credit Card ***** donations can be a one-time donation or you
may choose to have a specific amount charged to your card
automatically on a monthly basis. Please contact the Museum bookkeeper, Connie, via email at finance@NEERHS.org or by phone, 207-967-2712 ext. 5.

Online Donations - may be made by using a Credit Card: 
Click Here to make an online donation through the Museum's website - When at the Donation page: Fill in donor info, etc., when at "To which fund are you donating? Scroll down to "Other" and type in: 816-A Narcissus, then continue on filling in the required information.

Click Here for PayPal - to make an online donation: you can use email: finance@NEERHS.org and in the message box write:
For Narcissus fund 816-A

Donation of Securities ***** We also accept donations of
securities. You can contact the Museum bookkeeper, Connie, via email at finance@NEERHS.org or by phone, 207-967-2712 ext. 5,
for brokerage account information for accepting donated securities.

BONUS ***** If you work for a company/corporation that will
"match" an employee's donation to an approved 501c3 non-profit
educational organization, please be sure to complete the necessary paperwork with your employer so that your donation is matched :)

Questions? ***** Please contact Narcissus project manager:
Phil Morse, pmorse31@gmail.com or call 207-985-9723 - cell.

Thank You :)

Thank You for our Current Funding Partners
20th Century Electric Railway Foundation - 2018 - Major Gift, 2017/2014 Matching Grants
Mass Bay RRE - 2018 Railroad Preservation Grant 
Thornton Academy (Saco, ME) - Staff & Alumni - Matching Grant Challenge 2014
New England Electric Railway Historical Society (Kennebunkport, ME) - Member Donations
Amherst Railway Society - 2015 Heritage Grant
National Railway Historical Society - 2016 & 2015 Heritage Preservation Grants
Enterprise Holding Foundation - 2015 Community Grant
Theodore Roosevelt Association - Member Donations
John Libby Family Association and Member Donations
* The Conley Family - In Memory of Scott Libbey 2018/2017/2016/2015
* The W. S. Libbey Family - Awalt, Conley, Graf, Holman, Libbey, McAvoy, McLaughlin, Meldrum, O'Halloran, Salto, - 2018/2017
* The Hughes Family 2017/2016/2010
New Gloucester Historical Society and Member Donations
Gray Historical Society and Member Donations
Gray Public Library Association - Pat Barter Speaker Series
* LogMein - Matching Employee Donation
* IBM - Matching Employee/Retiree Donations
* Fidelity Charitable Grant - Matching Employee Donations
* Richard E. Erwin Grant - 2017/2016

The Narcissus, with interior back-lit, stained glass windows are majestic.
Make a donation today to help restore the interior of this Maine gem.
Help Theodore Roosevelt's Maine Ride get back on track! Once restored,
you will be able to ride in luxury on this National Register Treasure at
Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, Maine.
PWM photo

Please Consider Making a Donation to the project of the National Register of Historic Places member, Narcissus. We are currently raising funds to tell the incredible story of this Maine gem.

Various News stories during the summer of 2015 about the
Narcissus and its connection to Theodore Roosevelt. TR
was a passenger on the Narcissus on August 18, 1914.

Click Here to See the list of All Previous Blog Posts - Index

The Narcissus - July 31, 2015. Make a donation today.
Help Theodore Roosevelt's Maine Ride get back on track!
Once restored, you will be able to ride in luxury on this
Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, Maine.