Thursday, May 2, 2019

Maine Bicentennial: A Look Back at Riverton Park 1896-1933

Another busy day at Riverton Park. Open trolley cars like
the ones in this image could each carry 75 passengers.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_31_103

     As we approach Maine's Bicentennial year (2020), this blog will release posts that relate to many electric railway operations throughout the State of Maine. Here is the newest release in the Maine Bicentennial series of electric railways in Maine.

     This post features the Portland Railroad Company's, Riverton Park.

1897 programme for the Riverton Park Theatre. The original
1896 restaurant and casino is seen here. The building was
enlarged in 1898. Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

     The majority of the images used in this post are used with permission from the Portland Maine History 1786 to Present Facebook homepage. Additional resources used in this post are courtesy of Seashore Trolley Museum's Library; specifically from the O. R. Cummings Collection and "The Trolley Parks of Maine" 2012 book; Charles D. Heseltine, "Riverton Park", his unpublished manuscript that includes a transcript of the Portland Railroad Company brochure, Phil Morse (PWM) - O. R. Cummings books, "Portland Railroad" Part 1, 1957, and Part 2, 1959, and the Penobscot Maritime Museum; specifically from the Eastern Collection, which has more than 47 thousand images available to view online!!! 

Monument Square. Image circa 1910 courtesy PWM

     Monument Square in Portland, Maine was the hub for all the electric railway systems running into and out of Portland. This blog features the high-speed, luxury interurban, No. 14, Narcissus of the Portland-Lewiston Interurban (PLI) that is now being restored at Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, Maine. With that in mind, from 1914 until 1933, the Narcissus, as a PLI interurban, did operate into and out of Monument Square to pick up and discharge passengers. The Narcissus and nine other Maine vehicles used on electric railways have been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1980. 

No. 18, Azalea, was a high-speed luxury interurban of the
Portland-Lewiston Interurban (PLI). The interurbans would
exit/enter their right-of-way at Deering Junction (near
Allen Avenue) and use the Portland Railroad line from
Forest Avenue on its way to/from Monument Square where
passengers would board/disembark. Occasionally, a PLI
interurban would be chartered by a party to travel to
Riverton Park. The Azalea was used for such an
occasion on June 26, 1914, during an inspection trip just
prior to the opening of the line. There is an accounting of
the dining service and grounds as described by a
newspaper reporter. Image from the O.R. Cummings
Collection at a Seashore Trolley Museum.

Other posts that feature Street Railways in Maine
Click Here for the post: Ninety Communities in Maine had Electric Railway Service!
Click Here for the post: 57 Million Passengers Carried on Electric Railways in Maine in 1915!
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - History of the Portland Railroad 1860-1941
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - History of the Calais Street Railway 1894-1929
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - History of Aroostook Valley Railroad 1909-1946
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - Fryeburg Horse Railroad 1887-1913
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - The Norway and Paris Street Railway 1894-1918
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - Skowhegan & Norridgewock Railway 1894-1903
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - Benton and Fairfield Railway 1898-1928
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - The Somerset Traction Company 1895-1928
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - The Fairfield and Shawmut Railway 1903-1927
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - Waterville, Fairfield, & Oakland Rwy 1887-1937
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - Trolleys to Augusta, Maine 1889-1932
Click Here for the post: Maine Bicentennial series - Rockland, South Thomaston, & St. George Rwy

Seashore Trolley Museum, - Museum of Mass Transit, is celebrating its 80th Birthday-year in 2019! 
Special Events are scheduled  - Public operations start on May 4, 2019. 
Click Here for the 2019 Events & Special Activities for the 80th Anniversary Season, with hot links.

An original ticket from the Portland Railroad, c 1920 - PWM

     There were three pleasure parks on the Portland Railroad system - Riverton Park in Deering, Cape Cottage at Cape Elizabeth, and Underwood Springs Park on Falmouth Foreside. Of the three, the best known and most heavily patronized was Riverton Park on the Presumpscot River at Pride's Bridge. 

Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

      On Monday, June 27, 1896, the Portland Railroad Company opened Riverton Park, located on thirty acres at the intersection of Riverside Street and Forest Avenue in Portland, along the banks of the Presumpscot River; the site was formerly the location of the J. Winslow Jones Canning Factory. A reported 10,000 pleasure seekers arrived on opening day at the ornate wooden carriage entrance on the Portland Railroad Company streetcars. Regular cars left from Preble Street every 15  minutes starting at 8:30 a.m. to carry passengers to Riverton. One or more "wild" cars were required as extras to handle the rush to the park's theater. Bridal shower parties, card parties, and other private groups could hire a new, posh parlor car, "The Bramhall," for five dollars round trip. The motorman and conductor wore spiffy bowler hats and white kid gloves for these special trips.

Parlor Car - Bramhall - arrives 1896
     The double-truck parlor car trolley, "Bramhall", was built in 1896 by the J. G. Brill Company, Philadelphia, PA, and is said to have been given free to the Portland Railroad in appreciation for past and anticipated future business. It was primarily for use by PRR officials, but it was available for charter by special parties - at an extra rate, of course. It was a handsome one, painted in shiny black with gold leaf trim and lettering, and had ornamental iron grillwork on the ends. Interior was fitted with 20 wicker chairs with plush seats, tasseled curtains at the windows, and two cupboards (for spirits) at each end. In 1916, it was rebuilt as an experimental pre-payment car and became No. 500. Sadly, it was scrapped in the 1920s. Of the more than 300 railway vehicles that operated on the Portland Railroad throughout the life of the system, 1860-1941, only one original trolley from the line exists today, No. 615, built in 1920. No. 615 is at Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport and awaits its turn to be restored.

The parlor car, Bramhall, built in 1896 for the Portland
Railroad Company by the J. G. Brill Company.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_38_033

The interior of the parlor car, Bramhall.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_49_003

The parlor car, Bramhall, at Fort Allen shortly after arriving
in Portland in 1896.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_38_034

     The center attraction of the park was the Riverton Casino. The casino, with its broad piazzas, provided a lovely view of the Presumpscot River. A travel brochure describes "its surface dotted with canoes and other pleasure boats, all containing merry sailing parties." The travel brochure continues with a description of the attractively furnished dining hall: it was staffed by "an efficient corps of attendants serving tempting viands in answer to the promptings and desires of the inner man. The fizz of the soda fountain is also heard, while for the sweet tooth there is an excellent assortment of the finest creations in the confectionery line." The dance hall - "the scene of merry private parties" - was also very popular with its finely polished floor and live orchestra.

Park grounds also boasted a bandstand, a deer run and small zoo, a boathouse and steam launch, a steam riding gallery or carousel, a croquet field, lawn swings, a trout pond, and ample grounds and shelters for picnickers. The outdoor "Rustic Theatre", another attraction at the park, could seat 2,500 people. Theatrical attractions included high-wire and trapeze act, Alabama troubadours, comedy acts, and buck and wing dancing. La Petite Blanche, the Dainty Soubrette graced the stage, as did the Zanfarellas, "grotesque, comic, and daring dancers." And not to be outdone by the other trolley parks, Riverton had its own "Slide for Life," a thrilling acrobatic descent from a high tower. Visitors might see a hot-air balloon ascension and parachute adventure by Monsieur Roberto, Meteor of the Sky! In winter, even though the rest of the park was closed, the casino was available for club meetings, banquets, private socials and the like.

The well-known Boston firm of Frank M. Blaisdell, who designed the Boston Public Gardens, laid out the gardens and grounds at Riverton. No expense was spared in Riverton Park's creation. Broad lawns were ornamented with flower gardens and rare shrubberies. An advertisement describes the grounds: "Here and there throughout the park are rustic bridges, arches, arbors, seats, and in short the whole enclosure is thoroughly calculated to offer entrancing inducements to the visitor."

Riverton Park operated successfully for two decades until the beginning of Worl War I. Post-war economic conditions and the rise of the automobile spelled the end for the park as a trolley resort. The theatre performances were discontinued as patronage declined and the Portland Railroad began looking for a purchaser for the property, The park was leased to a private operator during the 1920 season, but with no success, closing the casino in mid-August. In 1921, the Portland Railroad Company sold Riverton Park including all buildings and land to a local realty group for $25,000, that proposed turning the park into a modern resort for autos. Riverton Park remained in operation, with additional amusement park rides and midway attractions, until 1933. The building s were razed.  In 1997, a group organized and became known as the Friends of Riverton Trolley Park. The group meets monthly and shares memorabilia from the park, and have organized park cleanup events and historical guided tours of the area.

August 1897 advertisement with an image of Riverton Park,
showing the boathouse and dock area and the casino in the
background. Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

Fold-out map from Hay's Tourism Brochure
in the Collection of Seashore Trolley Museum
included in 2012 publication, "The Trolley
Parks of Maine." 

The 1909 Portland Railroad streetcar
system map showing Riverton Park.
Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

1916 Portland Railroad streetcar lines map
shown as a modern transit system showing
Riverton Park. Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

1916 one-way rates for the PRR. From O.R.
Cummings 1957 book, "Portland Railroad",
Part 1.

A Historic Mapworks rendition of where the Riverton
Trolley Park was in relation to the Presumpscot River,
Forest Avenue, and Riverside Street. Also shown is the
trolley car route into the park. Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

Current screenshot from
Google Maps showing
Riverton Park 2019.

Riverton Trolley Park tracks seen on left and
then crossing Forest Avenue towards the
trolley car entrance to Riverton Park. In the
background, you can see the Pride's
Bridge that spans the Presumpscot River.
Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

An open trolley car enters the Riverton Trolley Park from
the Forest Avenue entrance. To the far left, you can see the
Pride's Bridge spanning the Presumpscot River.
Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

Riverton Park Boathouse with Pride's Bridge crossing the
Presumpscot River seen in the background.
Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

The trolley car entrance to Riverton Park circa 1896.
The building on the right is the Bicycle House. The casino
seen in the background is the original building, prior to 1898,
when it was enlarged and redesigned. Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

An open trolley car has entered Riverton Trolley Park from
the Forest Avenue entrance and is seen just as it passes the 
Bicycle House on its way towards the casino with the top
of the bandstand in the background. Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

The Riverton Trolley Park Bicycle House.
Image from Anvil Melwani via the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

Transportation to Riverton Park wasn't exclusively by means
of a trolley car or a carriage. Bicycles were also very
a popular mode of transportation to the park. Here is
Edwin Haskell and his daughter, Frances, on Forest
Avenue, with Riverton Park's casino in the background
Image from Pete Haskell, great, grandson of Edwin,
via the Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

This is an early image of the original casino in Riverton
Trolley Park circa 1896 taken from the lower road section near
the carriage entrance to the park off Forest Avenue. An open
trolley car can be seen at the front entrance to the casino
with the bandstand off to the right. Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

The carriage entrance to Riverton Park from Forest Avenue,
circa 1900. You can see the Bicycle House in the background
through the entrance way. Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

The casino (as enlarged and redesigned in 1898) is seen here
in the background through the carriage entrance. The building
on the left after passing through the entrance is the Boathouse
along the bank of the Presumpscot River. Photographers for
the Eastern Company took many photographs and from the
glass negatives, many popular colorized postcards of the
park were made. See the example in the postcard
image of this entrance four images below.
Courtesy Penobscot Marine Museum LB2007.1.111567

Riverton Park's original casino and restaurant in 1896 seen
here, was designed by John Calvin Stevens. The casino was
enlarged and redesigned in 1898. Image courtesy of
the Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

The bandstand at the Riverton Trolley Park. Some remains of
the stonework steps that led up to the bandstand may still be
visible today? Image courtesy of the Portland Maine History
1786 to Present.

Riverton Park - October 2, 1902, at the steps approaching
the bandstand are members attending a luncheon given by the 
Maine Commandery To The Commandery In Chief, Military
Order Of The Loyal Legion. General Joshua L. Chamberlain
is third from the right in the front row, Admiral James
McQueen Forsyth is fourth from right, Admiral Joseph
Coghlan firth from the right.  General George Porter
Mattocks is seen between and behind Chamberlain and
Forsyth. Major Henry S. Burrage, farthest to right in front,
was Maine State Historian from 1907 to 1926.
Image courtesy of the Portland Maine History
1786 to Present.

No. 163, a ten-bench, single-truck open car built in 1901
by the J. G. Brill Co. in Philadelphia, PA for the Portland
Railroad. The photo was taken from near the front entrance
to the casino and with the bandstand in the background.
Circa 1902. Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_31_102

A colorized postcard most likely created from the image
mentioned previously from a glass negative by Eastern Co.
Riverton Park opened on June 27, 1896. Regular Portland
Railroad cars left Monument Square for Riverton Park
every 15 minutes starting at 8:30 a.m. and generally, one
or more extra cars were required to handle the rush.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_31_072

The PRR trolley cars would enter the park and stop in front
of the casino to let passengers disembark and then to load
passengers for their return trip to any number of different
locations throughout southern Maine with connections
made via Monument Square.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_31_088

Where you see the open trolley car on the right is probably
the same spot where open car No. 163 is stopped for a picture
three images previous to this one.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_31_078

Description of trips from a 1910 PRR brochure. PWM

No. 125, a 12-bench open car built in 1896 by the J. G.
Brill Company, Philadelphia, PA for the Portland Railroad,
rests in front of the Riverton Trolley Park casino and
quietly awaits passengers to board prior to heading back
to Monument Square. Circa 1905. Image from O.R.
Cummings 1957 book, "Portland Railroad", Part 1.


Riverton Trolley Park lives up to its name in this postcard
postmarked, August 10, 1919. There may be as many as
twenty 12-bench, double-truck open cars in line. Each with
a capacity to carry 75 passengers. PWM

     Car colors? In the above postcard, one sees trolley cars in a variety of different colors. Up until about 1920, cars were painted with different colors according to the line or division within the PRR on which they were operated. Union Station-Munjoy Hill cars were light green and Spring Street-Grand Trunk Station cars were blue with gold striping. Cars running between Union Station and Grand Trunk Station were red. Stroudwater and  South Portland cars were also red, although of a different shade from the S&SP cars, and Deering cars were yellow. Yarmouth cars were originally yellow but later painted green. The first Westbrook cars were brown, but later, were dark green, the same dark green as the Saco Division cars. About 1920, all cars were painted red with white and gold blue trimming and gold leaf numerals.

     Here is a personal accounting of Riverton Park as reported in an op-ed:
Cumberland Center, Maine
May 18, 1978                     
Landmarks Observer
Portland, Maine

Dear Sirs,

  When I read your article about Riverton Park it brought back happy memories of my childhood
days, and later. I started going to Riverton Park in 1898 when I was ten years old. I will be 89 in
September and I doubt if there are very many people living now who can remember Riverton as
it flourished in those days. It was a real summer Paradise for both old and young, especially for
summer guests who came to Maine.
Trolley cars were the main attraction (no autos) and the fare was only five cents from Portland,
and that included a free ticket to the outdoor theatre where there were large stone steps and
a tree here and there for shade. I can still visualize the boys in white jackets, carrying large baskets
of hot buttered popcorn, peanuts, salt water taffy, cold beverages, etc., for five cents each.
We would carry our lunch and eat it in one of the large four-passenger swing chairs, where
we could listen to music from the Merry-Go-Round. With twenty-five cents in our pockets, we could
enjoy two trolley car rides, buy a bag of popcorn, a cold drink, one ride on the Merry-Go-Round,
besides all the free attractions.
The casino looked like a mansion to us kids with its carpeted floors and spacious dining room
where delicious meals were served for $1.00. And that was a lot of money in those days.

To the left of the grand Riverton Park Casino, you can see
the Boathouse and Pride's Bridge (but not the Presumpscot
River).  Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_31_107


The dining room in the casino of Riverton Park. Circa 1919
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_31_108

The Red Room in the casino at Riverton Park. One of
several rooms that would be used for private parties or 
any number of groups that may meet at the casino
for weekly or daily gatherings.
From the Collection of Seashore Trolley Museum.

I still have a "lucky charm" which I made in a slot machine in the casino. I printed my name
and the names of the two girls with me, also the date was August 14, 1898. A four-leaf clover
is in the center. That was nearly 70-years ago and I am still carrying it in my purse. The two
girls have passed away.

Handheld mirror souvenir of Riverton Park
showing the casino and bandstand.
Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

The only place to get drinking water was a faucet near the casino. A tin cup was chained to
it so it couldn't be removed, and thousands of people drank from the same cup which was never
washed, and I never heard that anyone died from germs, which would be called unsanitary today
I was at Riverton Park the day President McKinley was shot and it was announced
over a speaker. It cast a gloom over the park for the rest of the day.
I have never forgotten a song that I heard a fifteen-year-old boy sing on the show. He had a
lovely voice and the three of us 13-year-old girls fell in love with him but kept very quiet about
it and didn't screech and act silly as the young girls do today when they see a good-looking
boy. Girls in those days were more ladylike in public.  The name of the song he sang was "Among the Pines of Maine" and it was a beautiful song about Maine. I've often wondered why it never became popular. Too bad we didn't have tv
then.


One of the very early electric trolleys from Westbrook
has arrived and discharged its passengers at Riverton Park.
Bridal shower parties, card parties, and other private groups
could hire a trolley car to transport their group. The bandstand
in this image was one of the many attractions at the park.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_31_092

     After automobiles replaced the trolley cars, Riverton Park ended, and the lovely casino
was made into a skating rink. Even though it is restored it will never be the same to us oldsters
without the rustic theatre and trolley cars, but may help curb juvenile delinquency which is so prevalent today. In those days we didn't hear very much about the young folks getting into
trouble, they were having too much good clean fun at Riverton Park. Bus rides could never
take the place of trolley cars with the nice rides around the Belt Line for a dime or the rides to
Old Orchard Beach for fifteen cents.

A trolley ride around the North Deering Belt Line was a
popular outing in Portland for many years. The trip took just
one hour from Monument Square to the return at the same
point. Shown here in North Deering, No. 151, a 12-bench
double-truck open car built in 1899 - Photo from the
collection of Charles D. Heseltine - Courtesy Seashore
Trolley Museum Library: O. R. Cummings Collection
2009_2_31_042

Description of PRR trips from a 1910 brochure. PWM

     Only us Senior Citizens of 75 or older can remember the good old days when 25 cents
could mean an entire day's pleasure for both old and young at Riverton Park

                                                                                                          /s/ Gladys P. Anderson



The Rustic Theatre at Riverton Park - From the collection of
Seashore Trolley Museum - circa 1900

The Rustic Theatre at Riverton Park, circa 1900, could
seat 2,500 people. Postcard image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

The Rustic Theatre at Riverton Park, circa 1900 with the
Otto Brothers and orchestra. The crowd is also facing the
Presumpscot River which could be seen behind the stage.
Image courtesy of the

Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.


Riverton Park circa 1920s. Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

Aeroplaning at Riverton Park, circa the 1920s; Riverton Flyer
roller coaster in the background. Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.


Riverton Trolley Park circa 1925. Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.



Riverton Park circa the 1920s. Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

The Riverton Park Sunset Ballroom circa the 1920s.
Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

The Riverton Trolley Park Roller Coaster circa 1925.
Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

A rare, seldom seen postcard of the Riverton Flyer roller
coaster ride at Riverton Trolley Park.
Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

Straight-on-through view of the Rustic Bridge at
Riverton Park.  Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to present.


Riverton Park Trout Pond with the Rustic Bridge on the right
and a single horse hitched to a wagon in the background
probably used by the staff tending the gardens at the park.
Courtesy Penobscot Marine Museum LB2007.1.111568

Visitors pause on the Rustic Bridge and gaze into the Trout
Pond at Riverton Park. Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

Steam escapes from the stack of Riverton Park's steamer on
the Presumpscot River as it passes Riverton Park's walking
bridge. A portion of the Rustic Bridge is on the left.
Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

Some springs the Presumpscot River would flood its banks
and engulf some of the Riverton Park grounds.
Courtesy Penobscot Marine Museum LB2007.1.111560


Postcard postmarked August 14, 1911, shows a steamer
on a moonlight cruise on the Presumpscot River next to
Riverton Park with one end of a walking bridge that has
a bench seats under the canopy. PWM

Along the Presumpscot River in Riverton Park was this
wonderful rustic open-air, roofed, enclosure, for
people or private parties to gather. Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.


The boathouse and dock area of Riverton Park. In the
background, behind the boathouse, you can just see the front
of the Bicycle House, and to the left is the casino. This photo
was probably taken from Pride's Bridge (Forest Avenue).
Courtesy Penobscot Marine Museum LB2007.1.111572

Riverton Park in winter - circa 1905. Casino and Boathouse
overlooking a frozen Presumpscot River. Image courtesy of
the Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.


Canoeing along the Presumpscot was a favorite pastime
for many of the visitors to Riverton Park. Photo probably
was taken from Pride's Bridge, circa 1900
Courtesy Penobscot Marine Museum LB2007.1.111566


At what was the trolley entrance in the early years, you
can still see the trolley tracks on the right of the
Automobile Entrance to the parking area at Riverton Park
in the later years of the park operation.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_31_105


You can see the trolley tracks crossing Forest Avenue from the
left to the entrance to Riverton Park on the right. This
postcard is postmarked 1910. Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

A 12-bench, double-truck open car, perhaps No 119 with
Riverton Park on its destination sign. The conductor is using
the step brackets to either access the rooftop or safely
climb down from the rooftop. Changing the destination sign
and occasionally a trolley pole rope issue would require the
conductor to make the climb.
Courtesy Seashore Trolley Museum Library:
O. R. Cummings Collection 2009_2_31_096

Remnants of former carriage entrance to Riverton Park. These 
were refurbished by John Libby of Windham.
Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

The carriage entrance circa 1900.
Courtesy Penobscot Marine Museum LB2007.1.111567

A portion of what was the trolley car entrance to Riverton
Park. These were refurbished by John Libby of Windham.
Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

The trolley car entrance to Riverton Park circa 1896.
 Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

Former carriage entrance on the immediate left, with the 
remnants of the trolley car entrance in the background.
These were refurbished by John Libby of Windham
Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

The carriage entrance to Riverton Park from Forest Avenue,
circa 1900. You can see the Bicycle House in the background
through the entrance way. Image courtesy of the
Portland Maine History 1786 to Present.

Click on: "Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride," to learn about the young reader historical fiction chapter book due for release this fall. Proceeds will benefit the Narcissus Project :)

Please Consider a Donation to the Narcissus Project
to help us tell the incredible story of the Narcissus through the interpretation portion of the Narcissus Project.
Thank You

   Inside the Donald G. Curry Town House Restoration Shop, the Narcissus is in the midst of major work as we strive to complete its restoration. With our estimate to have the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Narcissus in the fall of 2021, we are now planning the interpretation portion of the Narcissus Project. Donations to the Narcissus Project may be used in the future to help tell the incredible 100-plus-year-old story of the Narcissus. Your donation to the Narcissus is helping to make the dream of the project's success, a reality.

The 2015 publication of, The Illustrated Atlas
of Maine's Street & Electric Railways
1863-1946, was published by the Library
at Seashore Trolley Museum, Kennebunkport.
Copies are available for purchase from the

Seashore Trolley Museum, - Museum of Mass Transit, is celebrating its 80th Birthday year in 2019! 
Special Events are scheduled  - Public operations start on May 4, 2019. 
Click Here for the 2019 Events & Special Activities for the 80th Anniversary Season, with hot links

Click Here for 2019 Special Events 


Click Here for 80th Anniversary Year - Seashore Trolley Museum 1939-2019 post
Click Here for the post - 80th Anniversary Year -A Look Back at the 50s - Seashore Trolley Mus.
Click Here for the post - 80th Anniversary Year - A Look Back at the 60s  - Seashore Trolley Mus.
Click Here for the post - 80th Anniversary Year -A Look Back at the '70s - Seashore Trolley Mus.
Click Here for The Birth of Seashore Trolley Museum Blog Post
Click Here for STM's Ten National Register of Historic Places Electric Railway Vehicles post
Click Here for 1901 Tower C Boston Elevated Railway to STM in 1975
Click Here for No. 38 - 1906 Manchester & Nashua Street Railway - Acquired March 21, 1940
Click Here for No. 60 - 1895 Manchester Street Railway - Acquired April 11, 1941
Click Here for No. 4387 - 1918 Eastern Mass. Street Railway - Acquired August 29, 1946
Click Here for No. 100 - 1906 Atlantic Shore Line Railway - Acquired 1949
Click Here for No. 108 - 1904 Portsmouth, Dover & York Street Railway - Acquired 1949
Click Here for No. 14 Narcissus 1912 Portland-Lewiston Interurban - Acquired 1969

See below for Donation options -

It starts with YOU
Your Donation Matters
Make a Donation TODAY

Please Help the Narcissus. 

Donation Options to Help the Narcissus Project:


The New England Electric Railway Historical Society (NEERHS)
is the 501c3 organization that owns and operates the Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, ME and the National Streetcar
The NEERHS is registered with the IRS (EIN# 01-0244457) and was incorporated in Maine in 1941.

Check or Money Order ***** should be made payable to:
New England Electric Railway Historical Society (NEERHS)
In the memo please write: Narcissus Fund 816-A
Mail to: Seashore Trolley Museum
              P. O. Box A
              Kennebunkport, ME 04046

Credit Card ***** donations can be a one-time donation or you
may choose to have a specific amount charged to your card
automatically on a monthly basis. Please contact the Museum bookkeeper, Connie, via email at finance@NEERHS.org or by phone, 207-967-2712 ext. 5.

Online Donations - may be made by using a Credit Card: 
Click Here to make an online donation through the Museum's website - When at the Donation page: Fill in donor info, etc., when at "To which fund are you donating? Scroll down to "Other" and type in: 816-A Narcissus, then continue on filling in the required information.

Click Here for PayPal - to make an online donation: you can use email: finance@NEERHS.org and in the message box write:
For Narcissus fund 816-A

Donation of Securities ***** We also accept donations of
securities. You can contact the Museum bookkeeper, Connie, via email at finance@NEERHS.org or by phone, 207-967-2712 ext. 5,
for brokerage account information for accepting donated securities.

BONUS ***** If you work for a company/corporation that will
"match" an employee's donation to an approved 501c3 non-profit
educational organization, please be sure to complete the necessary paperwork with your employer so that your donation is matched :)

Questions? ***** Please contact Narcissus project manager:
Phil Morse, pmorse31@gmail.com or call 207-985-9723 - cell.

Thank You :)

Thank You for our Current Funding Partners
20th Century Electric Railway Foundation - 2018 - Major Gift, 2017/2014 Matching Grants
Mass Bay RRE - 2018 Railroad Preservation Grant 
Thornton Academy (Saco, ME) - Staff & Alumni - Matching Grant Challenge 2014
New England Electric Railway Historical Society (Kennebunkport, ME) - Member Donations
Amherst Railway Society - 2015 Heritage Grant
National Railway Historical Society - 2016 & 2015 Heritage Preservation Grants
Enterprise Holding Foundation - 2015 Community Grant
Theodore Roosevelt Association - Member Donations
John Libby Family Association and Member Donations
* The Conley Family - In Memory of Scott Libbey 2018/2017/2016/2015
* The W. S. Libbey Family - Awalt, Conley, Graf, Holman, Libbey, McAvoy, McLaughlin, Meldrum, O'Halloran, Salto, - 2018/2017
* The Hughes Family 2017/2016/2010
New Gloucester Historical Society and Member Donations
Gray Historical Society and Member Donations
Gray Public Library Association - Pat Barter Speaker Series
* LogMein - Matching Employee Donation
* IBM - Matching Employee/Retiree Donations
* Fidelity Charitable Grant - Matching Employee Donations
* Richard E. Erwin Grant - 2017/2016

The Narcissus, with interior back-lit, stained glass windows are majestic.
Make a donation today to help restore the interior of this Maine gem.
Help Theodore Roosevelt's Maine Ride get back on track! Once restored,
you will be able to ride in luxury on this National Register Treasure at
Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, Maine.
PWM photo

Please Consider Making a Donation to the project of the National Register of Historic Places member, Narcissus. We are currently raising funds to tell the incredible story of this Maine gem.

Various News stories during the summer of 2015 about the
Narcissus and its connection to Theodore Roosevelt. TR
was a passenger on the Narcissus on August 18, 1914.

Click Here to See the list of All Previous Blog Posts - Index

The Narcissus - July 31, 2015. Make a donation today.
Help Theodore Roosevelt's Maine Ride get back on track!
Once restored, you will be able to ride in luxury on this
Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, Maine.

1 comment:

  1. Just a few kind words. I have loved photographs as long as I can remember. They gave me great enjoyment.

    photo retouching

    ReplyDelete